Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Introducing Kwort Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Kwort is a linux distribution based on Slackware Linux and has recently been added to the Distrowatch waiting list. It comes with kernel 2.6.14.2, Xorg 6.9.0, gcc 3.3.6 and xfce 4.2.3.2. Their site states, "Kwort's desktop and applications are completely based on the gtk2 toolkit." Tuxmachines took Kwort for a spin around the block, and this is what we discovered.

My usual practice when evaluating a new distribution is to download, install and/or boot it. Although I get bit sometimes, I prefer for my first impressions to be unclouded by previous information or screenshots. With older established distros this is impossible, but a rare treat with kwort. I had seen Kwort's lovely site in order to find the downloadable iso, but I avoided any information or screenshots.

Not long after booting the install cd I became aware that Kwort is based on Slackware. They use a slightly simplified Slackware installer. Basically, only the target partition is asked before the install begins and then it installs a base system. Afterwhich it asks about your dialup modem, network configuration, and lilo choices. Upon boot it walks the user through configuration of alsa, root password, and an user account before it asks for the install cd again.

        

I put the cd in the same device used for install, but not the first device in the chain. The installer output that it could not find the cd and exited to login. I rebooted in hopes it would continue, but it didn't. I can only assume the installer was going to continue installing software packages and possibly a few other configurations. Instead I mounted the install cd and changed directory to the extras folder. From there I installed every package included using the retained Slackware installpkg. I checked for the existence of an xorg.conf file and upon finding one, edited it for my purposes and started xfce4.

The xfce desktop is customized slightly for Kwort. It features a cute wallpaper with what I can assume to be their mascot. I can't tell what kind of creature he's supposed to be, but he's fairly cute as he dangles and hangs on for dear life with a pleasantly surprized look on his face. Apparently I've lead a sheltered life and wikipedia is no help here. There is no information on the site about their interesting mascot either.

        

In the menus we find a few applications for various tasks. The whole of OpenOffice.org 2.0 is installed as well as Firefox 1.5, gaim, xchat, Slypheed, the gimp, xpdf and xfmedia player among others. The xfmedia player did surprisingly well with mpegs and avis. Mplayer was installable through their kpkg and was able to play bins as well.

        

        

        

Speaking of kpkg, this is the application that makes Kwort unique. Up until the discovery of this application I was thinking Kwort is a nice little system, but what's the hook? How can I interest my readers in another Slack variant? Unfortunately kpkg isn't included in the Kwort 2.0 currently available on their mirrors. One must download and install it separately. At that point, it becomes a remote package installation application. For now the mirrors have limited access as well as limited applications, but the program has great potential. As is at this early stage, it works wonderfully once a connection can be established. Can we dare predict this will be included in future releases?

        

The kpkg application as well as the whole of Kwort fits extremely well into the philosophy of Slackware as I interpret it. Greatness thru simplicity. Kwort is light-weight and high-performing. It's extremely stable. The only problem encountered during my test run was the xfce4 panel "disappeared" from view. It was easily restarted at the commandline and exhibited no further adverse behaviors.

Hardware detection was fairly good at this time. There are wireless packages and pcmcia detection as well as the usual sound, video, and drives. Although usb and my tv card were detected, there are no scanner packages, backend drivers, nor any tv or radio applications available. There were no browser plugins installed or available. There kernel source was installable through kpkg from the Kwort repository and the nvidia drivers built with no problem.

Information is sparce on the Kwort site. There is a list of developers, containing introductory information on the developers. They are primarily from Argentina and the eldest is all of 23 years old. One is a KDE maintainer, but I wasn't able to locate any KDE packages at this time. There is a forum in place for information and support.

In conclusion, I found Kwort to be an interesting project. Although in their infancy, the system is fast, stable, and contains a basic choice of applications. There could be more package selection, but perhaps we will see more in the future. If you are a fan of slackware, like to test new distributions, or just want a nice light-weight system, you may want to consider testing Kwort for yourself.

My Screenshots and Theirs.

Kwort's mascot, Splean

"... what I can assume to be their mascot. I can't tell what kind of creature he's supposed to be ... There is no information on the site about their interesting mascot either."

My private eye noticed in ANNOUNCE_ENGLISH.TXT: "People who I would like to thank: Savelii Vassiliev who is excellent producing graphics, icons, and animations".

Then, take this: http://kwort.barrahome.org/index.php?gadget=StaticPage&id=3
"Name: Savelii Vassiliev"
"Creator of splean, the Kwort pet".

I then can take the pet as being "Splean", whatever was this supposed to mean.

However, given that the artwork guy is born in Russia, I'm pretty much sure he's a fan of the Russian band http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Splean

I suppose it's the Russian for "spleen": http://dime32.dizinc.com/%7Erussmus/bands-splin.htm reads: "Сплин / Splin (Splean, Spleen)"

re: Kwort's mascot, Splean

Oh cool, good stuff. Thanks for the info.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to install MySQL server on CentOS 8 Linux - nixCraft

    How do I install MySQL server 8.0 on CentOS 8 Linux server running on Linode and AWS cloud? How do I add and set up a new MySQL user and database account on the newly created CentOS server? Oracle MySQL server version 8.0 is a free and open-source free database server. It is one of the most popular database system used in web apps and websites on the Internet. Typically MySQL is part of the LAMP (Linux, Apache/Nginx, MySQL, Perl/Python/PHP) stack. Popular open-source software such as WordPress, MediaWiki, and others profoundly used by MySQL as a database storage engine. Let us see how to install MySQL server version 8.x on CentOS 8 Linux server.

  • Linux Fu: VPN For Free With SSH | Hackaday

    If you see a lot of banner ads on certain websites, you know that without a Virtual Private Network (VPN), hackers will quickly ravage your computer and burn down your house. Well, that seems to be what they imply. In reality, though, there are two main reasons you might want a VPN connection. You can pay for a service, of course, but if you have ssh access to a computer somewhere on the public Internet, you can set up your own VPN service for no additional cost. The basic idea is that you connect to a remote computer on another network and it makes it look like all your network traffic is local to that network. The first case for this is to sidestep or enhance security. For example, you might want to print to a network printer without exposing that printer to the public Internet. While you are at the coffee shop you can VPN to your network and print just like you were a meter away from the printer at your desk. Your traffic on the shop’s WiFi will also be encrypted.

  • YANUB: yet another (nearly) useless blog: QSoas tips and tricks: using meta-data, first level

    By essence, QSoas works with \(y = f(x)\) datasets. However, in practice, when working with experimental data (or data generated from simulations), one has often more than one experimental parameter (\(x\)). For instance, one could record series of spectra (\(A = f(\lambda)\)) for different pH values, so that the absorbance is in fact a function of both the pH and \(\lambda\). QSoas has different ways to deal with such situations, and we'll describe one today, using meta-data. [...] QSoas is a powerful open source data analysis program that focuses on flexibility and powerful fitting capacities. It is released under the GNU General Public License. It is described in Fourmond, Anal. Chem., 2016, 88 (10), pp 5050–5052. Current version is 2.2. You can download its source code there (or clone from the GitHub repository) and compile it yourself, or buy precompiled versions for MacOS and Windows there.

  • Many ways to sort file content on Linux

    The Linux sort command can arrange command output or file content in a lot more ways than you might realize--alphabetically, numerically, by month and randomly are only some of the more interesting choices. In this post, we take a look at some of the more useful sorting options and explain how they differ.

  • How to install Luminance HDR

    Luminance HDR is an open-source GUI tool that provides an easy to use toolkit for HDR imaging. It is available on all major Linux operating systems and is excellent for photographers. In this guide, we will go over how to install Luminance HDR on Linux.

  • How to add a WordPress user sign up - Anto Online

    Adding an external user sign up page on a website allows users to register for different roles. Once registered, they can perform tasks such as adding new articles, new comments, and even performing other actions such as designing. Allowing a user to sign up is a common thing for bloggers and companies that accept guest posts. However, this feature can also be used to offer premium content for your members. But, this may require more custom fields and branding. The default WordPress sign up page contains fixed fields and a WordPress logo.

  • How to install Lyrebird on a Chromebook - a Discord Voice Changer

    Today we are looking at how to install Lyrebird, a voice changer for Discord on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to play Brawlhalla on Linux

    Brawlhalla is a free-to-play 2D fighting game. It was developed by Blue Mammoth Games, published by Ubisoft, and released on Nintendo Switch, Xbox One, PS4, and PC. In this guide, we’ll show you how to play it on Linux.

Games: RetroArch, PulseAudio, Anarch

  • You can now try the RetroArch Playtest on Steam for Linux | GamingOnLinux

    With the awesome RetroArch application for running emulators and all sorts coming to Steam, they now have a Playtest available you can opt into to try it out. Using the new dedicated Steam Playtest feature announced by Valve in early November, developers can have a banner on their Steam store page letting users request access. So the Libretro team have put this up, and as of today it also has Linux builds available for testing.

  • PulseAudio 14.0 Released With Better USB Gaming Headset Support - Phoronix

    While in 2021 we might begin to see PipeWire replacing PulseAudio by default at least on bleeding-edge distributions like Fedora, for now PulseAudio still is the dominant sound server used by desktop Linux distributions. Rolling out today is PulseAudio 14.0. PulseAudio 14.0 comes with many changes compared to PulseAudio 13.0 that shipped all the way back in September of 2019.

  • "Anarch", a new, public-domain Doom-like game coded from scratch in <256K

    I've argued that the video-game "Doom" is a sort of cultural version of Turing Completeness. Given that we're jamming computers and screens into just about any device these days, inevitably (and delightfully) someone gets it to run Doom: Watches, digital cameras, ATMs, pregnancy sticks. But you know what's even cooler? Creating your own new, original game in the exactly style of Doom, and making it so wildly resource-efficient that it fits in under 256K and will run on just about any computational device around. That's what the programmer Miloslav Číž has done, with his new game "Anarch". You can play it in your browser here or download it here; I just blasted away in it for a while, and it's a hoot — he neatly channels the mechanics and twitchy low-rez aesthetics of the original. Gameplay trailer is here; he put it in the public domain, and the code is all here on Gitlab.

Announcing Istio 1.6.14

This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.6.13 and Istio 1.6.14 Read more More:

  • ISTIO-SECURITY-2020-011
  • Support for Istio 1.6 has ended

    As previously announced, support for Istio 1.6 has now officially ended. At this point we will no longer back-port fixes for security issues and critical bugs to 1.6, so we heartily encourage you to upgrade to the latest version of Istio (1.8) if you haven’t already.

Moving into the future with the FSF tech team

The FSF is well-known for spearheading the advocacy and support of free software, not just by recommending it in the face of pervasive proprietary options, but also by condemning nonfree software altogether. Following this recommendation is hard, even for us, because of the ever-increasing dependency on software and computer networks that we are all subject to. To follow through with our commitment, our tech team maintains a large list of services that many other offices our size would have long ago been wrongly pressured into transferring to one of the handful of gigantic corporations that monopolize those services. Your work email account is most likely implemented through Gmail or Outlook; your office's software is likely to be served by Amazon Web Services, along with all the data backups; your company's customer service is likely to be managed through Salesforce or SAP, and so on. Make no mistake, this is true for your local government and school networks, too! In contrast, at the FSF, we never jumped on the outsourcing wagon, and we don't use any Service as a Software Substitute (SaaSS) in our operations. We run our own email servers, telephony and fax service, print shop, full server stack, backups, networking, systems monitoring, accounting, customer relationship management (CRM) software, and a long list of other tasks and software development projects, with a team of just four extremely dedicated technicians. And we implement this on hardware that has been carefully evaluated to meet very high ethical standards, criteria that we push for vendors to achieve through our "Respects Your Freedom" certification program. Read more