Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Introducing Kwort Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Kwort is a linux distribution based on Slackware Linux and has recently been added to the Distrowatch waiting list. It comes with kernel 2.6.14.2, Xorg 6.9.0, gcc 3.3.6 and xfce 4.2.3.2. Their site states, "Kwort's desktop and applications are completely based on the gtk2 toolkit." Tuxmachines took Kwort for a spin around the block, and this is what we discovered.

My usual practice when evaluating a new distribution is to download, install and/or boot it. Although I get bit sometimes, I prefer for my first impressions to be unclouded by previous information or screenshots. With older established distros this is impossible, but a rare treat with kwort. I had seen Kwort's lovely site in order to find the downloadable iso, but I avoided any information or screenshots.

Not long after booting the install cd I became aware that Kwort is based on Slackware. They use a slightly simplified Slackware installer. Basically, only the target partition is asked before the install begins and then it installs a base system. Afterwhich it asks about your dialup modem, network configuration, and lilo choices. Upon boot it walks the user through configuration of alsa, root password, and an user account before it asks for the install cd again.

        

I put the cd in the same device used for install, but not the first device in the chain. The installer output that it could not find the cd and exited to login. I rebooted in hopes it would continue, but it didn't. I can only assume the installer was going to continue installing software packages and possibly a few other configurations. Instead I mounted the install cd and changed directory to the extras folder. From there I installed every package included using the retained Slackware installpkg. I checked for the existence of an xorg.conf file and upon finding one, edited it for my purposes and started xfce4.

The xfce desktop is customized slightly for Kwort. It features a cute wallpaper with what I can assume to be their mascot. I can't tell what kind of creature he's supposed to be, but he's fairly cute as he dangles and hangs on for dear life with a pleasantly surprized look on his face. Apparently I've lead a sheltered life and wikipedia is no help here. There is no information on the site about their interesting mascot either.

        

In the menus we find a few applications for various tasks. The whole of OpenOffice.org 2.0 is installed as well as Firefox 1.5, gaim, xchat, Slypheed, the gimp, xpdf and xfmedia player among others. The xfmedia player did surprisingly well with mpegs and avis. Mplayer was installable through their kpkg and was able to play bins as well.

        

        

        

Speaking of kpkg, this is the application that makes Kwort unique. Up until the discovery of this application I was thinking Kwort is a nice little system, but what's the hook? How can I interest my readers in another Slack variant? Unfortunately kpkg isn't included in the Kwort 2.0 currently available on their mirrors. One must download and install it separately. At that point, it becomes a remote package installation application. For now the mirrors have limited access as well as limited applications, but the program has great potential. As is at this early stage, it works wonderfully once a connection can be established. Can we dare predict this will be included in future releases?

        

The kpkg application as well as the whole of Kwort fits extremely well into the philosophy of Slackware as I interpret it. Greatness thru simplicity. Kwort is light-weight and high-performing. It's extremely stable. The only problem encountered during my test run was the xfce4 panel "disappeared" from view. It was easily restarted at the commandline and exhibited no further adverse behaviors.

Hardware detection was fairly good at this time. There are wireless packages and pcmcia detection as well as the usual sound, video, and drives. Although usb and my tv card were detected, there are no scanner packages, backend drivers, nor any tv or radio applications available. There were no browser plugins installed or available. There kernel source was installable through kpkg from the Kwort repository and the nvidia drivers built with no problem.

Information is sparce on the Kwort site. There is a list of developers, containing introductory information on the developers. They are primarily from Argentina and the eldest is all of 23 years old. One is a KDE maintainer, but I wasn't able to locate any KDE packages at this time. There is a forum in place for information and support.

In conclusion, I found Kwort to be an interesting project. Although in their infancy, the system is fast, stable, and contains a basic choice of applications. There could be more package selection, but perhaps we will see more in the future. If you are a fan of slackware, like to test new distributions, or just want a nice light-weight system, you may want to consider testing Kwort for yourself.

My Screenshots and Theirs.

Kwort's mascot, Splean

"... what I can assume to be their mascot. I can't tell what kind of creature he's supposed to be ... There is no information on the site about their interesting mascot either."

My private eye noticed in ANNOUNCE_ENGLISH.TXT: "People who I would like to thank: Savelii Vassiliev who is excellent producing graphics, icons, and animations".

Then, take this: http://kwort.barrahome.org/index.php?gadget=StaticPage&id=3
"Name: Savelii Vassiliev"
"Creator of splean, the Kwort pet".

I then can take the pet as being "Splean", whatever was this supposed to mean.

However, given that the artwork guy is born in Russia, I'm pretty much sure he's a fan of the Russian band http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Splean

I suppose it's the Russian for "spleen": http://dime32.dizinc.com/%7Erussmus/bands-splin.htm reads: "Сплин / Splin (Splean, Spleen)"

re: Kwort's mascot, Splean

Oh cool, good stuff. Thanks for the info.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

RISC-V and NVIDIA

  • Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform Enlists Deep Learning Accelerator
    SiFive introduces what it’s calling the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. A demo shown at the Hot Chips conference consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • SiFive Announces First Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform With NVIDIA Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, the leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world's first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • SiFive Announces Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform with Nvidia Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, a leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA’s Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive’s HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world’s first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive’s silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • NVIDIA Unveils The GeForce RTX 20 Series, Linux Benchmarks Should Be Coming
    NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang has just announced the GeForce RTX 2080 series from his keynote ahead of Gamescom 2018 this week in Cologne, Germany.
  • NVIDIA have officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs, launching September
    The GPU race continues on once again, as NVIDIA have now officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs and they're launching in September. This new series will be based on their Turing architecture and their RTX platform. These new RT Cores will "enable real-time ray tracing of objects and environments with physically accurate shadows, reflections, refractions and global illumination." which sounds rather fun.

today's leftovers

GNOME Shell, Mutter, and Ubuntu's GNOME Theme

Benchmarks on GNU/Linux

  • Linux vs. Windows Benchmark: Threadripper 2990WX vs. Core i9-7980XE Tested
    The last chess benchmark we’re going to look at is Crafty and again we’re measuring performance in nodes per second. Interestingly, the Core i9-7980XE wins out here and saw the biggest performance uplift when moving to Linux, a 5% performance increase was seen opposed to just 3% for the 2990WX and this made the Intel CPU 12% faster overall.
  • Which is faster, rsync or rdiff-backup?
    As our data grows (and some filesystems balloon to over 800GBs, with many small files) we have started seeing our night time backups continue through the morning, causing serious disk i/o problems as our users wake up and regular usage rises. For years we have implemented a conservative backup policy - each server runs the backup twice: once via rdiff-backup to the onsite server with 10 days of increments kept. A second is an rsync to our offsite backup servers for disaster recovery. Simple, I thought. I will change the rdiff-backup to the onsite server to use the ultra fast and simple rsync. Then, I'll use borgbackup to create an incremental backup from the onsite backup server to our off site backup servers. Piece of cake. And with each server only running one backup instead of two, they should complete in record time. Except, some how the rsync backup to the onsite backup server was taking almost as long as the original rdiff-backup to the onsite server and rsync backup to the offsite server combined. What? I thought nothing was faster than the awesome simplicity of rsync, especially compared to the ancient python-based rdiff-backup, which hasn't had an upstream release since 2009.