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The Great Features of KDE Workspaces and Applications Part I - Dolphin

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For the first part of this blogseries I picked Dolphin. A basic application, that lets you do file management. Dolphin is very powerful application, so let's have a look at what all you can do with it.

Dolphin has four main areas. The panel on the left is your bookmarks/favorite/quickaccess places. Adding your own places is as easy as it can get - simply drag a folder and drop it there. Another way is to create it manually via panel's context menu, where you can even set your own label and icon, that's the 'My narcistic pictures' item for example. Reordering items to your own likening is again just a matter of drag and drop. You can also drag any folder/file to the places in that sidebar and it will be copied to that place. When you have some removable media, they are automatically displayed there as well and you can disconnect/eject them from the very same panel (as well as from other places).

rest ehre

look at Dolphin 2.0

cristalinux.blogspot: As some of you may know, one of the most exciting changes/features landing at KDE 4.8 is Dolphin 2.0. The KDE main file manager is already full of powerful features and has seen its performance heavily improved in recent releases, but sounds like the jump to version 2.0 will bring several impressive extras.

Peter Penz goes deep into details in his ARTICLE on the subject, so I very much encourage reading it in full for those interested. For a quick summary, though, here are some highlights:

rest here

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