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Firefox 10: Can Mozilla Afford To Miss Silent Updates?

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Moz/FF

Mozilla released the downloads of Firefox 9 Beta, which will be released just before Christmas as final, as well as Firefox 10 Aurora, the developer version of Firefox. But even with six new versions within one year, Mozilla may not have accomplished what the rapid release process promised: Most notably, Mozilla released substantial memory improvements this year, but it will miss some features it so desperately needs to compete with Chrome.

Mozilla announced the availability of Firefox 10 Aurora a bit earlier today and those who are following Firefox development may have been surprised by the feature set that is currently laid out. The details are mentioned here and there are plenty additions in this release, albeit not those the average user may get excited about. So, the explanation is that Firefox 10 focuses on HTML5 enhancements, which would include the HTML5 Visibility API as well as 3D Transforms as well as WebGL anti-aliasing (which is not part of HTML5). Despite those 40 or so additions and modifications, I am not sure if it will be enough.

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