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Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2011 is here

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MDV

Following the Mandriva Linux free 2011 Mandriva is proud to launch the Mandriva Powerpack 2011, the full version of Mandriva Linux! Based on its new product strategy, Mandriva changes the release procedure, aiming for a one-year period between major releases. However, Mandriva will also release updated versions of its products on a periodic time on a 6-month basis.

Quicker, easier and more secure than ever, Mandriva Linux offers new functionalities which revolutionize the desktop. Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2011 is the most advanced Linux Operating System to date, a genuine concentration of technologies and innovations. It supports a wide panel of hardware configurations, making it a stable base for users. It combines simplicity with conviviality in an intuitive, high performing environment. It is the ideal distribution for all users, from the beginner to the most advanced.

Designed to meet users’ real needs in terms of security, performance and ergonomy, Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2011 is everything you ever wanted from an operating System.

Mandriva Powerpack 2011, offers:




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