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Best Linux email client: 5 reviewed and rated

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Software

The email client, along with the word processor, is probably one of the most recognisable pieces of software on the desktop. They come in all shapes and sizes, from standalone lightweight command-line clients, to massive personal information managers (PIMs), that do a lot more than just check email.

There are various factors you need to consider when selecting a client. What type of user you are and how you want to use it are the most critical. If you're an enterprise user fetching email from the corporate email server, you'll probably have the client running all the time, so it needs to be well-integrated into the desktop.

If you're a home user, though, who only wants to back up email from an online service, your demands are very different.

rest here




KMail took a real bashing

KMail took a real bashing in that review!

Migrating to KMail 4.7.2 from an earlier version was a real pain for me because of the broken migration assistant and other bugs. It is a real pity when open source software is released when it is very buggy and unreliable. It was a similar situation with the early releases of KDE4, Amarok and Kaffeine (which still doesn't work properly). Broken software should not be pushed onto users, imo. When will they learn?

I'm only complaining because I care about and use KDE4 and KMail. It does not give a good user experience when your mail program messes up. A non-technical user would say *!@# KMail and switch to another client. As it happens, I was able to get it working but I almost switched to Thunderbird!

It is a pity they didn't use KMail 4.6 (which IIRC was the last non-Akonadi version of KMail) in the review, it would have fared better.

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