Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Best Linux email client: 5 reviewed and rated

Filed under
Software

The email client, along with the word processor, is probably one of the most recognisable pieces of software on the desktop. They come in all shapes and sizes, from standalone lightweight command-line clients, to massive personal information managers (PIMs), that do a lot more than just check email.

There are various factors you need to consider when selecting a client. What type of user you are and how you want to use it are the most critical. If you're an enterprise user fetching email from the corporate email server, you'll probably have the client running all the time, so it needs to be well-integrated into the desktop.

If you're a home user, though, who only wants to back up email from an online service, your demands are very different.

rest here




KMail took a real bashing

KMail took a real bashing in that review!

Migrating to KMail 4.7.2 from an earlier version was a real pain for me because of the broken migration assistant and other bugs. It is a real pity when open source software is released when it is very buggy and unreliable. It was a similar situation with the early releases of KDE4, Amarok and Kaffeine (which still doesn't work properly). Broken software should not be pushed onto users, imo. When will they learn?

I'm only complaining because I care about and use KDE4 and KMail. It does not give a good user experience when your mail program messes up. A non-technical user would say *!@# KMail and switch to another client. As it happens, I was able to get it working but I almost switched to Thunderbird!

It is a pity they didn't use KMail 4.6 (which IIRC was the last non-Akonadi version of KMail) in the review, it would have fared better.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu MATE Project Donates Money to Ubuntu and Debian

The Ubuntu MATE project is known for the fact that it contributes back, and it rewards developers for their work. It happened a few times already, and the latest projects awarded are Ubuntu and Debian. Read more

Ubuntu 15.04 Received Very Well by Linux Community

Canonical released Ubuntu 15.04 a couple of weeks ago, and it seems that it's been a success. The community is mostly reporting a nice experience, which is important since this is the first Ubuntu release that uses systemd instead of upstart. Read more

The current state of Drupal security

Greg Knaddison has worked for big consulting firms, boutique software firms, startups, professional service firms, and former Drupal Security Team leader. He is currently the director of Engineering at CARD.com and a Drupal Association advisory board member. Michael Hess works with the University of Michigan School of Information and the UM Medical Center teaching three courses on content management platforms and overseeing the functionality of hundreds of campus websites. He serves in a consulting and development role for many other university departments and is the current Drupal Security Team leader. He also consults with BlueCross on large-scale medical research projects. Hess is a graduate of the University of Michigan School of Information with a master's degree in information. Read more

Ultimate Boot CD Live Aims to Become a Parted Magic Replacement, Based on Debian

The development team behind the popular UBCD (Ultimate Boot CD) project have announced recently that they are working on a Live version of Ultimate Boot CD, which is currently based on the Debian GNU/Linux operating system and has the ultimate goal of becoming a Parted Magic replacement. Read more