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Building The Linux Kernel In 60 Seconds

Filed under
Hardware

In less than one minute, it's now possible to build the Linux kernel from source on a desktop. What's the magic behind this?

Unfortunately it's not due to some crazy new compiler optimizations for GCC (or LLVM/Clang would be more likely) or any magical change in the Linux kernel build infrastructure, but it's thanks to the Sandy Bridge Extreme Edition. The Intel Core i7 3960X Extreme Edition is one hell of a mighty processor.

rest here




Kernel-Building

mrpogson.com: Today, I read that Michael Larabel tested building a kernel in 60s so I thought I would time Beast. While using Beast as my desktop, running Opera and a bunch of others, I did

make mrproper;make defconfig;time make

and this is what I got:

rest here

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