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The five fastest-booting Linux distributions

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Linux

Reboots tend to be rare with Linux. Usually, they’re due to a kernel update or an environmental issue. But regardless of the reason, it’s crucial it come back to life quickly. One issue surrounding Linux of late is boot time. Some distributions have made it a key feature to attract users. Some have even succeeded in reaching that magic 10-second number. But which distributions boot fastest? Let’s take a look.

NOTE: Console logins do not count.

1: Puppy Linux

Puppy Linux is not the fastest-booting distribution in this crowd, but it’s one of the fastest. And what’s unique about this distribution is that it will boot faster than your standard OS, even when it’s booting from the Live CD. Of course, some may claim, “It’s not a full-blown OS”. But it is. Although many view Puppy more as a rescue distribution, it’s a full-blown distribution that offers nearly every tool you need to do what you need to do.

Average boot time:

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