Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A Wayback Machine journey with BeOS R4, Zeta 1.0, and Haiku

Filed under
OS

As the staff of Ars Technica convenes in Chicago for some infrequent face-to-face time, we're turning the clock back to 1998. It was a time when Windows 95 ruled the desktop, preemptive multitasking on the Mac was still a gleam in Steve Jobs' eye, enthusiasts were furiously overclocking their Celeron 300a CPUs, and the attention of geeks was distracted by a unusually bright, shiny object: BeOS.

The history of BeOS is a long and sad one, and this is neither the time nor the place to recount it. Suffice it to say that Be Inc. breathed its last in November 2001 and the operating system once known as BeOS has lived something of a twilight existence ever since, in the form of Zeta's YellowTab and Haiku.

We begin our journey by looking at BeOS R4.




More in Tux Machines

What To Expect In 2015: Robots Join The Open-Source Revolution

The number of downloads doubled in 2014, to 3.5 million, and Gerkey expects adoption to spike again with the release of ROS 2.0 this summer. The upgrade will coordinate swarms, improve walking, and support smart sensors—basically, assimilate the world’s robots. Read more

New Input Drivers Coming For Linux 3.19 Kernel

One of the latest pull requests for the Linux 3.19 kernel is the input driver subsystem pull, which includes numerous updates along with a few new drivers. The new drivers will benefit some Google Chromebooks in running the latest upstream kernel. Read more

Docker and the Linux container ecosystem

Linux container technology is experiencing tremendous momentum in 2014. The ability to create multiple lightweight, self-contained execution environments on the same Linux host simplifies application deployment and management. By improving collaboration between developers and system administrators, container technology encourages a DevOps culture of continuous deployment and hyperscale, which is essential to meet current user demands for mobility, application availability, and performance. Read more

Green Hills challenges “rudimentary” Linux debug

Green Hills Software has announced a software development environment for embedded Linux developers. According to Green Hills, the Linux development software in its MULTI tool suite will address the “rudimentary” state of many debuggers for Linux, which it said were “difficult to learn, setup, and use and lack the powerful control and visibility that modern electronic systems demand”. Read more