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Dapper delay looks likely after online meeting

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Ubuntu

Developers, users and interested parties met online last night to discuss Ubuntu Dapper Drake's possible six-week delay, proposed by Mark Shuttleworth last week. The large group had mixed feelings, but on the whole seemed to be in agreement with Shuttleworth - rather delay for a "polished" product.

To date, Ubuntu has stuck to a rigid six-month cycle in line with the release of Gnome, which has proved to be a big attraction for home users who get a major technology upgrade twice a year, but in a pretty stable distribution.

While no vote was taken at the meeting, the Ubuntu Community Council and Tech Board was represented. It will be up to these two groups to decide on the delay.

Concerns were raised over the potential public relations backlash over the delay, as well as the knock-on effect of future releases.

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