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Fedora 16 Live/Install CD

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Linux

I used Unetbootin to install the Live/Install CD onto a USB stick. No problems booting into live mode and then installing from the live mode. The installed edition booted just fine. With the exception of some Gnome3 applications not correctly sizing to my netbook screen, the installed applications worked. Yet, I have major issues with this edition.

Fedora 16 uses GRUB2 as a boot loader, which I prefer. For the life of me, I cannot understand why Fedora developers installed the GRUB2 files in /boot/grub2. Since the standard directory is /boot/grub, os-prober fails to find Fedora from other Linux distros. The only exception is Super Grub2.

If you are looking for an absolutely minimal version of Gnome3, Fedora has it. It does not come even with the basic configuration tool provided in Linux Mint. So far, I haven’t found it in the Fedora repository.

rest here




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