Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

What Does Linux and Role Playing Games Have in Common?

As a recently revived Game Master/DM going back to my RPG roots in Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, 1st Edition after about a 20 year absence, I find that computer technology has impacted Role Playing Games far beyond being able to play online.

People have been working over the years to "free gaming". Yes, Free in the same terms as open Source software that we use today. Both "free beer" and "Free-dom".

Linux has an Open Source License in the GPL and RPG's have the Open Game License. Due to the proprietariness of many of the original artwork and story content of the gaming modules of games like Advanced Dungeons & Dragons and other game systems, it has become very difficult to access new "modules" or published adventures in which to continue playing the game people have become so fervent over.

Thus, the Open Game License was created to allow "near beer" versions of traditional games systems that allow fans and groups to legally "side step" those proprietary concerns of the original games and still continue to publish and make available new content for game systems that are no longer sold or are out of print but still under copyright.

It's a legal tightrope walk to be sure. Avid fans and supporters work very hard to stick to the rules in order to keep their favorite games alive. The good news...it's working.

Open licenses have far trancended the software universe and continue to have meaningful impact on very diverse areas of social life. I'm not entirely sure that table top RPg's could not only continue to exist but actually are experiencing growth in the ranks, without Open licensing.

The fight for "open-ness" is a good fight and goes way beyond making access of software and media accessible to the masses. Stiking a victory for open licenses in one arena is a victory for open licences in other arenas as well.

More in Tux Machines

The 20 Best Mate Themes for Linux System in 2020

Linux is the most popular open-source UNIX like an operating system. It is well known because of its lightweight. Unlike other OS, it can be used in a wide range of hardware devices that include PCs, laptops, netbooks, mobile, tablet, video game consoles, servers, and even in supercomputers. Mate is a desktop environment that comes with extensive features, while all the primary metaphors of Linux distribution remain the same. It comes with a lot of Linux compatible applications and can be considered as the continuation of the GENOME 2 project. It has already replaced the traditional GNOME shell. There are several powerful mate themes available out there that can help you to make your Mate desktop more clean, modern, and eye-catching as well. Read more

today's howtos

SUSE/OpenSUSE Reports on YaST and Tumbleweed Development

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 92

    Until now, the Partitioner landing screen has been useful to have a big picture of the devices in your system and as a shortcut to jump directly to the device page just with a double click over it. But, do you know what? From yast-storage-ng 4.2.74 on you can work directly with devices from that screen similar as you already do in the more specific pages, through the contextual actions added below the devices list. That means, for example, no more jumps to Hard Disks just to add a new partition nor resize an existing one. [...] We got some bug reports about how installation progress reporting works and while we were touching it, we also added a few smaller improvements to the code. The first change is that nowadays installing from multiple discs almost never happens but still there was always a “Medium 1” column which did not make much sense. So we removed the column and if there is a multi-media source, it will be appended to the name if needed. The second visible change is a new Unicode character ⌛ (hourglass) during the initial phase of RPM installation until the remaining time can be estimated. The third change is that now the maximum time is always capped at 2 hours, so even if there are multiple sources and some of them took more then two hours, it always show just “>2:00:00” and even in total it is capped, so it can no longer show something like “>6:00:00”. The fourth one is that now you can read the release notes without disturbances. Previously you would get switched to the package log tab after each package finished its installation. Now it will redraw only when you go back from the release notes screen. The fifth one is a fix for showing the remaining packages, where it is shown only for the active source and not for all. So now it shows remaining packages for all repositories. And last but not least we do a bunch of refactoring, code quality improvements and also adding automatic unit tests to reduce regressions in the future.

  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/04

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers, During week #4, we have released five snapshots. And this, despite having discarded two snapshots for QA issues. openQA saved our users from crashing chromium inside a KDE/Wayland session for example. The five snapshots released were 0116, 0117, 0118, 0121 and 0122.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (git and python-apt), Oracle (openslp), Red Hat (chromium-browser and ghostscript), SUSE (samba, slurm, and tomcat), and Ubuntu (clamav, gnutls28, and python-apt).

  • Why Networking Monitoring Tools are Important and How to Pick One?

    In today’s world, a business has to have a strong online presence to build a brand and to stay connected with the target demographic. To achieve that, it’s critical that your online network is protected against common cyber-attacks and hacking attempts so that there is minimal downtime. Network monitoring allows you to bolster your business network and also to make the most of your resources.

  • There are no root causes

    At the if statement, the CPU uses past measurements to make a prediction about which branch might be taken, and it then begins to execute that path, even though ‘x > y’ has not been executed or completed yet! At this point x or y may not have even finished being computed yet! Let’s assume for now our branch predictor thinks that ‘x > y’ is false, so we’ll start to execute the “return false” or any other content in that branch. Now the instructions ahead catch up, and we resolve “did we really predict correctly?”. If we did, great! We have been able to advance the program state asynchronously even without knowing the answer until we get there. If not, ohh nooo. We have to unwind what we were doing, clear some of the pipeline and try to do the correct branch. Of course this has an impact on timing of the program. Some people found you could write a program to manipulate this predictor and using specific addresses and content, they could use these timing variations to “access memory” they are not allowed to by letting the specualative executor contribute to code they are not allowed to access before the unroll occurs. They could time this, and retrieve the memory contents from areas they are not allowed to access, breaking isolation. [...] Our computers are still asynchronous, and contain many out-of-order parts. It’s hard to believe we have “found” every method of exploiting this. Indeed in the last year many more ways to bypass hardware isolation due to our systems async nature have been found.