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Is Mandriva Finished This Time?

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Public details are still a bit sketchy, but if the various forum posts are accurate, Mandriva will most likely shut their doors on January 16. Mandriva has had a long history of financial problems and this latest one could be the one to take Mandriva out. But then again, Mandriva always seems to pull one out of the hat at the last minute. After all, all they need is a whole lot of money.

On the Mandriva Forum, Raphaël Jadot, a long-time contributor, wrote, "everything was fine, but there is a big problem: a minor shareholder (Linlux) refuses the capital injection required for Mandriva to continue, even though the Russian investor had offered to bear it alone. Except turnaround Mandriva should cease activity Jan. 16." No further details were made available there. But as news crept around the various forums more did emerge.

rest here




They should just move the

They should just move the whole thing to Russia and be done with it, Rosalabs did a good job so far.
Old Mandrake users will probably like to follow http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=rosa

The whole Russian connection

The whole Russian connection just scares me. So much cybercrime has come from there, it's enough to deter me from ever using it again if it were just moved there.

That's a pretty ignorant

That's a pretty ignorant statement I think. Not all Russians are cybercriminals.

Don't generalise, it's wrong.

Don't generalise, it's wrong. There is more cybercrime coming from USA than Russia, do you feel the same about americans?
Russians can be really good devs, I really don't see a problem with that; plus the whole thing is open source so if you're paranoid stick your nose into it and look for issues. ROSA labs actually did a lot of significant, visible work in Mandriva, more than anyone else did in the last years in that company if you ask me.

Sources?

Of course you have real sources for that statement right?

Most academic security sources cite Russia, Eastern Asia, China, Korea, and South America as the largest source of cyber attacks and malware.

America ranks 3rd or 4th for the source of SPAM, which isn't quite the same thing as malware.

http://eprints.eemcs.utwente.nl/20081/01/paper.pdf

Sites like Sophos or Kaspersky or NIST or Secunia or even the NSA site agree (withing reason) of that assessment.

Besides, most cyber attacks sourced from America come from botnets inside america whose controllers are located elsewhere (so you can label americans stupid and or lazy, but not necessarily criminal).

right

vonskippy wrote:

Besides, most cyber attacks sourced from America come from botnets inside america whose controllers are located elsewhere (so you can label americans stupid and or lazy, but not necessarily criminal).

"Of course you have real sources for that statement right?"

This is getting way off topic anyway, let's just stop here.

My point was there's nothing to fear from ROSA labs, in this case it's just prejudice hurting them. And if you're paranoid, their product is entirely open source so you can inspect it.

Mandriva's Demise

Many years ago I was an ardent Mandrake user. I continued for a long time with it, through Mandriva 9. Back then I was also using Mandriva as a server where I worked, and I very much liked Mandriva's GUI control center configuration utilities (mostly written in Perl I believe) particularly for the ease of setting up services and configuring daemons.

Later, when I retired, I no longer needed to use Mandriva as a server. In addition, it seemed like each Mandriva release came with an increasing number of bugs and issues.

Then the Mandriva derivatives, first PCLinuxOS and quite a bit later, Mageia came out. I use both of these on various desktops at home. I've been using Mageia Cauldron (their development version) for a few months now, and other than few problems with the switch to systemd, it's been fairly smooth. Just upgraded Mageia Cauldron version of KDE to 4.8 RC2 this morning. Good stuff.

I've got Kororaa 16 Linux (a Fedora derivative) running on my laptop. Though the KDE implementation isn't quite as slick, it's not bad. And Fedora has lots of Python3 development stuff in their repositories, which I dabble with.

So, the demise of Mandriva, if it happens, won't have the devastating effect on my Linux use it once would have. Still, I'm a little saddened as it was my goto distro for many years.

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