Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Mint 12 Lisa Review

Filed under
Linux

Until the release of Ubuntu 11.04, Gnome 2.x seemed to have become the standard desktop interface for Linux. It was the default for Ubuntu, Fedora and Linux Mint, three of the biggest distributions, and many others relied on it too. Of course, lots of people use KDE, but since they released version 4, things seemed to have swung in Gnome’s favour.

Then came 2011. With the release of Ubuntu 11.04, Ubuntu switched to Unity; shortly after that, Gnome 3 was released with the Shell interface, and this was quickly put to work in Fedora.

Many users hated both interfaces. They broke their traditional work patterns, made strange decisions, such as removing shutdown buttons, and all kinds of other $terror. The result was that many users flocked to Linux Mint – the only one of the big three not to pursue a new desktop for much of 2011.

Everyone was left asking what Linux Mint would do when their next big release came out. Would they take the path of least resistance and follow Ubuntu, their parent distribution, by accepting Unity? Or would they stick with upstream and make Gnome Shell their default? Maybe they might give Gnome 2.x a new lease of life and keep that as the default – it would certainly win them a lot of fans! Linux Mint 12 is now out, and we know the answer to this question: none of the above.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

GNOME News

  • Sysprof + Builder
    After the GNOME 3.20 cycle completed I started revamping Sysprof. More here, here, and here. The development went so smoothly that I did a 3.20 release a couple of weeks later. A primary motivation of that work was rebuilding Sysprof into a set of libraries for building new tools. In particular, I wanted to integrate Sysprof with Builder as our profiler of choice. On my flight back from GUADEC I laid the groundwork to integrate these two projects. As of Builder 3.21.90 (released yesterday) you can now profile your project quite easily. There are more corner cases we need to handle but I consider those incremental bugs now.
  • GUADEC… Its been fun.
    I’m not really much of a traveler or outgoing in any way. So when I was invited to GUADEC, I wasn’t very sure about it. It took some encouragement from my mentor and a fellow GSoC mate to convince me. And… I’m glad I went! It was one of those things that I could not have experienced from my comfy chair to which I reserve myself for the greater part of my day. In fact this trip makes me feel I might be wrong about social interactions not being time well spent for me (but then again I don’t exactly buckle down into ambitious projects, so you’re free to call me ignorant).
  • gnome-boxes: GSoC Evaluation
    This post is meant to be a final self-evaluation and self-analysis of my work for gnome-boxes during the summer. The initial project idea was about implementing/fixing a bunch of SPICE-based features/bugs to/in Boxes. The list of bugs of the SPICE component has since changed, as some new bugs have been discovered and some old ones have been closed, so I made a summary of my involvement...

Paid-for Microsoft Openwashing at LinuxCon

Android/Google Leftovers

3 open source alternatives to Office 365

It can be hard to get away from working and collaborating on the web. Doing that is incredibly convenient: as long as you have an internet connection, you can easily work and share from just about anywhere, on just about any device. The main problem with most web-based office suites—like Google Drive, Zoho Office, and Office365—is that they're closed source. Your data also exists at the whim of large corporations. I'm sure you've heard numerous stories of, say, Google locking or removing accounts without warning. If that happens to you, you lose what's yours. So what's an open source advocate who wants to work with web applications to do? You turn to an open source alternative, of course. Let's take a look at three of them. Read more