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From Zero to Drupal in 30 Minutes

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Drupal

The flexible Drupal content management system (CMS) lets you build all kinds of websites, from simple blogs to complex giant multimedia extravaganzas. You’ve probably heard the buzz, but maybe you were nervous about trying to install and configure the software yourself. Drupal is well-documented, except for the basic steps to launch a new site. Don’t worry – we’ll walk through those steps together. With this howto, you just might literally build a new Drupal site in 30 minutes or less.

Everyone wants to know which is the best open source CMS. Most open source CMSes are more alike than different. They use the same LAMP (Linux, Apache or other HTTP server, MySQL or other database, PHP/Perl/Python) stack, and most are administered via a graphical web interface. If you know PHP, or whatever scripting language your CMS is written in, you can customize the software beyond the limitations of its graphical interface. I like Drupal because is it so flexible, and thanks to its giant community of developers cranking out countless themes and plugins, I can tart it up any way I like without having to dig into PHP files.

I’m using Drupal 7 in this howto because it’s the latest stable version. A lot of sites still use Drupal 6, which is a perfectly good version, but it’s a little different.

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today's howtos

Openwashing