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Easily Create Screencast Videos With Kazam Screencaster

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Software
HowTos

If you’ve ever searched around on YouTube for walkthroughs, tutorials, or video reviews of popular software or Linux distributions, you may find them to be pretty useful.

Such videos are much better than a written guide or review because you can see how something works or where you can find it. You can also hear the person who made the video talk about what he or she is doing, along with any other notes. A video, therefore, is much more effective.

Let’s see how we can construct them ourselves.




Re: Easily Create Screencast Videos with Kazaam...

Let's put Kazaam into perspective. It's basically a Linux GUI ffmpeg front end, with some uploading convenience to common video access sites such as YouTube.

You record the fullscreen--you can't record a user chosen region.

I couldn't find a place to download the source code to compile it (maybe I missed it--I didn't look that hard). Anyway, it appears to have only Ubuntu PPA's for installation on that platform.

Right now, for open source software under Linux, recordmydesktop with the corresponding GUI front ends: gtkrecordmydesktop and qtrecordmydesktop seem to be the best bet for free opensource screencast capturing programs.

For me, the best screencast recorder program I've used under Linux is the proprietary "demorecorder" at www.demorecorder.com. I purchased it, and it ain't cheap. But I can get really good screencast videos with excellent video and audio quality.

Under MS Windows, camtasia has similar high quality, and it isn't cheap either.

I wish the open source screencast recording stuff was as good as the commercial proprietary stuff, but, in my experience, it isn't (yet). Maybe someday.

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