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How 'Post-PC' could be good for Linux

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Linux

Over the past decade Linux has made little progress in terms of becoming a credible threat to the dominance of Microsoft in the desktop space. After years of prediction that the ‘Year of the Linux desktop’ was coming, market share still lingers at around the 1% mark. In fact, even Mac OS X, with all of Apple’s resources at its disposal, is barely making a dent in the Windows market share. But could the shift away from the PC towards a more ‘Post-PC era give the OS the much-needed boost it is looking for?

Things are changing. The widespread acceptance of tablets and smartphones has encouraged users to stop thinking of computing as something done in front of a desktop or notebook, and instead as something they do while on the move on a myriad of different devices, from smartphones to tablets to web tops. While the era of the x86 PC might be coming to a close (and to be fair, it’s had a good run, with over 30 years as the primary computing platform), computing is more personal than ever.

So why might this be good for Linux?




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today's leftovers

  • Red Hat - Another Quarter And A Totally New Set Of Investor Perceptions
  • BIG open-source love Microsoft and Google? You still won't catch AWS [Ed: Microsoft does not love FOSS (or loved by it); it actively attacks FOSS.]
    Open source wasn’t supposed to matter in the cloud. After the Free Software Foundation’s failed attempt to rein in network-delivered software services, some wrung their hands and waited for the open source apocalypse. Instead of imploding, however, open source adoption has exploded, with ever more permissive licenses rising to largely eliminate the need to contribute anything back.
  • Open Source Data:The Last Frontier of the Fintech Revolution
    In the early days of computing, programmers and software developers shared their creations learned from each other and therefore advanced computing and software engineering to new heights.
  • The cheap arm project: An affordable, open-source robotics project
    What do you get when you put together wood and rope? Well according to Plymouth University’s Professor Guido Bugmann: a low-cost, open source, 2 meter tall robot! All buildable for under £2000. The Cheap Arm Project (CHAP) began as an MSc project aimed at developing an affordable mobile robot arm system that could be used by wheelchair users to access daily objects at inaccessible heights or weights (the extreme case being 2 litre bottle).
  • European Interoperability Framework: Commission presents new guidance for digital public services
    The announcement will be made today, at the Digital Day in Rome, together with other initiatives that aim to promote cooperation between EU Member States to better prepare society to reap the full potential of the digital transformation. Many EU Member States are digitising their public administrations to save time, reduce costs, increase transparency, and improve the quality of services that they offer to citizens and businesses. Doing this in a coordinated way ensures that the public sector is not only digital but also interoperable. The EU framework published today will help Member States to follow a common approach when making their public services available online, also across countries and policy areas. This will contribute to reducing bureaucracy for people and businesses, for example, when requesting certificates, enrolling to services, or handing in tax declarations.
  • Carbon Black warns of over reliance on 'nascent' machine learning security

    Security professionals cited high false positive rates and the ease with which machine learning-based technologies can be bypassed – at present – as the most serious barriers to adoption.

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