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A Short Trip Down Memory Lane

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Linux

Back in 2006, I was a fresh-faced new GNU/Linux adventurer.

About a year after my first install of Ubuntu, I posted THIS at Scot’s Newsletter Forums, a site which has since become my second home. Some of my opinions have changed since then. For instance, I don’t use KDE anymore (not since 3.5). I also don’t care for Google too much these days, not since they’ve started showing their greedy fangs… “Do no evil” Pffffft! Yeah, right. Anywho…

Relatively quickly I settled on Slackware as my primary operating system. My GNU/Linux mentor, Bruno Knaapen, once predicted that I would end up with Slackware because I definitely had the Slacker attitude. Miss you, Bruno, old friend. He called that one right. I run Slackware as my primary and Arch Linux as my secondary (backup) OS on my main system. I also run Slack on my laptop and my shop systems.

Rest here




The Nocturnal Slacker

I read the Nocturnal Slacker's article yesterday and found it interesting because his journey from Windows to Gnu/Linux and onward was very similar to my own. So, I posted a short comment, telling bits of my 'Trip Down Memory Lane'. At the end I also mentioned that I had encountered a glitch on his wordpress site and asked him why he was using so many buttons on his pages. But none of this ever appeared in the comments section below the article. It was pre-moderated, suppressed, censored, call it what you like, and I am wondering who does Eric Layton think he is to supresses other people's comments at will? Are there no values, no ethics anywhere these days?

The following is the original text I posted yesterday on the "Nocturnal Slacker v1.0" web site. See for yourself just how offensive it is ...

Very interesting. My reasons to move to GNU/Linux were the same as yours. If I hadn't been so complacent and lazy I would have made that move years earlier (my first experiments with Suse and Mandrake were in the late 90s) but XP was just too damn convenient. In the beginning (2004) I was just as promiscuous as you were. But after some time I settled on Debian and haven't changed since, despite the lure of Ubuntu. Of course I'm still curious and I try out the live images of new and promising looking distros. Although Slackware proper was never really my cup of tea I do find Salix excellent. Occasionally, very rarely, I feel a whiff of nostalgia for pre 2004 times, as happened a few days ago when a friend told me that she's processing all her photos in IrfanView. This reminded me of the applications I used to use then ... IrfanView, Notepad2, the 1by1 audio player, XMplay etc. But apart from this I have never looked back. Vista, Win7, Win8, ... are as alien to me now as Apple has always been.

P.S.:
Accessing your page was extremely sluggish because "www.sharingbuttons.org" just wouldn't load for minutes. Only after I put that URL into my hosts file and reloaded your page could I scroll and read your whole article. You say you don't care for Google, but I'm wondering ... do you really need all these silly buttons? Don't you think Facebook is just as bad, if not worse?

I did reply to you there, my

I did reply to you there, my friend. I have to screen comments because of SPAM, unfortunately. The delay before the comments appear is due to... well, the fact that I was sleeping when you posted your comment. I receive email notifications of new comments from my blog every 15 minutes, but I have to be awake and online to receive them. I'm sorry that the delay annoyed you.

I do appreciate your (and everyone's) comments on my articles. They are a very important part of my blogging process. Feedback is important. It lets a writer know whether or not he/she is actually helping/entertaining his/her readers in some way. I write for personal gratification that I get from helping folks in the GNU/Linux/Internet community. I'm not a paid writer.

I also answered your query regarding the sharing buttons on my blog.

Thanks for reading and commenting (here and there). I hope you will stop by again. Smile

~Eric

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