Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Firefox in 2012

Filed under
Moz/FF

The first public version of the browser called "Firefox" -- a 0.8 release, came out 8 years ago. With that release and the 1.0 release later that same year, we showed the world that browsers mattered.

Innovative new features like tabbed browsing, pop-up blocking, spell-checking, integrated search, and browser add-ons, re-invigorated not just the browser market, but the entire Web. We put users in control of that mess of windows, and the horrible pop-ups from advertisers and malware makers. We made it simple for users to customize their experience and to find what they were looking for without jumping through a bunch of hoops.

In addition to those awesome new user-facing features, Firefox delivered great performance, stability, compatibility, and security at a time when Internet Explorer was falling down on most of those fronts. It wasn't enough to offer great user features, the integrity and quality of the product had to be top notch and it was.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Void GNU/Linux Operating System Adopts Flatpak for All Supported Architectures

Void Linux, an open-source, general-purpose GNU/Linux distribution based on the monolithic Linux kernel, is the latest operating system to adopt the Flatpak application sandboxing technologies. Read more

Top 4 CDN services for hosting open source libraries

A CDN, or content delivery network, is a network of strategically placed servers located around the world used for the purpose of delivering files faster to users. A traditional CDN will allow you to accelerate your website's images, CSS files, JS files, and any other piece of static content. This allows website owners to accelerate all of their own content as well as provide them with additional features and configuration options. These premium services typically require payment based on the amount of bandwidth a project uses. Read more

Bash Bunny: Big hacks come in tiny packages

Bash Bunny is a Debian Linux computer with a USB interface designed specifically to execute payloads when plugged into a target computer. It can be used against Windows, MacOS, Linux, Unix, and Android computing devices. It features a multicolor RGB LED that indicates various statuses and a three-position selector switch: Two of the positions are used to launch payloads, while the third makes Bash Bunny appear to be a regular USB storage device for copying and modifying files. Read more

openSUSE Leap's New Versioning Scheme Finally Syncs with SUSE Linux Enterprise

openSUSE Board Chairman Richard Brown informed the community about a major version number change for upcoming releases of the openSUSE Leap operating system. As some of you might know already, openSUSE Leap 42.2 is the current stable release of the GNU/Linux distribution based on the sources of the commercial SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) operating system designed for enterprises, and the next scheduled release is openSUSE Leap 42.3, which is currently in development. Read more