Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A Rolling-Release Version Of Fedora Is Discussed

Filed under
Linux

A discussion erupted this morning among Fedora developers about having a version of Fedora Linux that operates on a rolling-release model similar to Arch Linux, Gentoo, and openSUSE Tumbleweed.

This is what effectively began the discussion this morning on the fedora development list, "Fedora would appear to be out of line in not taking on board the potential user base for a rolling release version. For servers there would be huge advantages in management of systems. Is there any support at all within the development community for a rolling release version of Fedora (and possibly ultimately Redhat)? Is there a possibility that not moving to rolling release could ultimately damage Fedora in the future as other distributions increase their support base?"

Almost immediately, Fedora Rawhide was brought up.




Rolling Release

#!

(CrunchBang)

Rolling Release

There are times when a release requires a half dozen or more file changes, and subsequently, over time, other changes related to the first group. In this situation, it is better to have a fixed release, where everything can be synchronized and tested together.

In the rolling release, small changes are better. And with the introduction in Fedora17 (as it is with SUSE), btfrs will be able to protect your system by providing a rollback if the changes dont work on your system.

Rolling releases also mean that the file system may remain somewhat fragmented.

It would be great to have both, with nightly builds replacing the 6 monthly panics.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

OpenStack Juno is out, Debian (and Ubuntu Trusty ports) packages ready

This is just a quick announce: Debian packages for Juno are out. In fact, they were ready the day of the release, on the 16th of October. I uploaded it all (to Experimental) the same day, literally a few hours after the final released was git tagged. But I had no time to announce it. This week-end, I took the time to do an Ubuntu Trusty port, which I also publish (it’s just a mater of rebuilding all, and it should work out of the box). Here are the backports repositories. For Wheezy: deb http://archive.gplhost.com/debian juno-backports main deb http://archive.gplhost.com/debian juno main For trusty: deb http://archive.gplhost.com/debian trusty-juno-backports main Read more

Video: Systemd the Core OS (no coughing)

There has been so much negative stuff about systemd on teh Interwebs lately. It is so sad. Quite a few distros picked systemd because they liked a lot of the features it has. Why do the people who like systemd actually like it? Sure, if you look hard enough, you can find those answers... but I remembered a video where the man himself explains it. Read more

GParted 0.20 Improves Btrfs Support

GParted 0.20.0 is out today with a release that primarily improves Btrfs support. The improved Btrfs support comes via now handling support for resizing Btrfs file-systems that span multiple devices. GParted 0.20 also has GRUB2 restoration steps added to the help manual plus various translation updates. Read more

Ubuntu Touch RTM Update Is Out, Has Better Performance and Beautiful New Indicators

Ubuntu developers had some minor problems in the week before with all sorts of bugs that were popping out. They postponed the release of a new update for the Ubuntu Touch RTM and, at one point, they even got everyone to focus on fixing the problems and nothing else. Now they have a new version out and progress really shows. Users who already have Ubuntu Touch on their phones might have noticed that the number of features added to the system have diminished drastically, but that's the way it should be. The system is getting closer to its final stages and there is little reason to add new options now. The current form of the OS is not very far from the official release, so only fixes remain to be made. Read more