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A Rolling-Release Version Of Fedora Is Discussed

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Linux

A discussion erupted this morning among Fedora developers about having a version of Fedora Linux that operates on a rolling-release model similar to Arch Linux, Gentoo, and openSUSE Tumbleweed.

This is what effectively began the discussion this morning on the fedora development list, "Fedora would appear to be out of line in not taking on board the potential user base for a rolling release version. For servers there would be huge advantages in management of systems. Is there any support at all within the development community for a rolling release version of Fedora (and possibly ultimately Redhat)? Is there a possibility that not moving to rolling release could ultimately damage Fedora in the future as other distributions increase their support base?"

Almost immediately, Fedora Rawhide was brought up.




Rolling Release

#!

(CrunchBang)

Rolling Release

There are times when a release requires a half dozen or more file changes, and subsequently, over time, other changes related to the first group. In this situation, it is better to have a fixed release, where everything can be synchronized and tested together.

In the rolling release, small changes are better. And with the introduction in Fedora17 (as it is with SUSE), btfrs will be able to protect your system by providing a rollback if the changes dont work on your system.

Rolling releases also mean that the file system may remain somewhat fragmented.

It would be great to have both, with nightly builds replacing the 6 monthly panics.

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