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Open source Pandora handheld gaming console finally up for pre-order

Filed under
Hardware
Gaming

The OpenPandora project is an open source project to create a handheld gaming console using open source designs and open source software. The Pandora has an ARM-based processor, Linux-based operating system, and support for a wide range of game console emulators along with a QWERTY thumb keyboard and dual analog game controllers.

It’s been about four years since the project was started, and only a handful of Pandora units have been shipped so far due to a number of obstacles. But the group has found a new company to produce Pandora systems and plans to begin mass production in February.

You an pre-order a Pandora for 375 Euros and up.




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