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Raspberry Pi – Size doesn’t Matter

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Hardware

Raspberry Pi, a newly launched credit-card sized computer, weighing about 45g, can be plugged into your TV and a keyboard. The main purpose of this innovation, by the Raspberry Pi Foundation is a charitable one; by building the cheapest computer at $25, can provide an assured fundamental level of functionality.

This little PC has almost all the features of a desktop PC. It is equipped with spreadsheets, word processing and games. It also plays HD videos, has a SD card slot and connectors, that project over the edges. Mike, keyboards, network adapters and external storage will all connect, via a USB hub. A composite HDMI, out of the board allows you to hook it up, to a digital analogue, television or to a DVI monitor. There are adapters available with a standard 3.5mm jack, or you can use HDMI. It also supports any USB microphone via a hub. It is a $25 computer that is powerful enough to run Quake 3, an incredibly powerful 3D video game.

There are two models of Raspberry Pi;




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