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The Case for the /usr Merge

Filed under
Linux

Fedora (and other distributions) have begun work on getting rid of the separation of /bin and /usr/bin, as well as /sbin and /usr/sbin, /lib and /usr/lib, and /lib64 and /usr/lib64. All files from the directories in / will be merged into their respective counterparts in /usr, and symlinks for the old directories will be created instead:

/bin → /usr/bin
/sbin → /usr/sbin
/lib → /usr/lib
/lib64 → /usr/lib64

You are wondering why merging /bin, /sbin, /lib, /lib64 into their respective counterparts in /usr makes sense, and why distributions are pushing for it? You are wondering whether your own distribution should adopt the same change? Here are a few answers to these questions, with an emphasis on a compatibility point of view:

Compatibility: The Gist of It




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