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Review: Oil Rush (PC, Mac, Linux)

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Gaming

Anchors Away!

Most RTS games situate players on solid ground. Armies of soldiers, tanks and airplanes move about according to the player’s will, which results in glorious victory or crushing defeat. Unigine’s Oil Rush attempts to give strategy fans the same experience, only this time the battle takes to the seas and a dose of tower defense is added for good measure.

The world has been in conflict for some time and most of its landmasses have sunk underwater; the remaining factions of the world fight over the most precious commodity: oil. Players take on the role of Kevin, an up-and-coming officer in a militaristic organization known as the Sharks. With the help of a fellow pilot by the name of Firefly, Kevin leads a small army to different locations around the globe under orders from the leader of the Sharks, the mysterious “Commander”.

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