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Easing Data Migration

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While moving to a new operating system is not trivial, its complexity pales in comparison to the struggles of migrating actual data from one platform to another in production environments. The ability to migrate data between different operating systems can reduce IT costs, either as part of platform migrations or multi-platform workflows.

Many companies undertake elaborate migration projects that require the manual migration of data. However, manually migrating data between typically disparate and incompatible systems requires a substantial investment of time and labor. In fact, this complexity often overwhelms the benefits it promises. Moreover, such migrations can trigger a range of risks in data loss, data corruption, policy compliance, and -worst of all - production downtime.

As a result, a growing number of organizations are turning to automated data migration tools to minimize such costs and risks in migrating production data workloads.

To overcome these challenges, a growing number of organizations are turning to new technologies that don't move the data but simply let it be accessed from another operating system host. The key to this technology is a new default disk format, the basis of platform-independent virtual volume building blocks, often called portable data containers. Volumes formatted with the new parameters of this disk format can be used with volume manager solutions regardless of the operating environment that initialized the disk (including issues like endianess). The resulting volume format enables platform-specific dependencies to be removed from the data movement equation, including sector and block size.

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