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Ubuntu’s HUD: Why It’s A Terrible Idea

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Ubuntu

I just read another article proclaiming why HUD (Head Up Display) is a great idea. The gist of it is that

* HUD learns on the job improving its performance with use.

* HUD allows you to search for menu items by hitting Alt + search terms

* HUD is faster and easier to use/learn.

In fighter aircraft the idea of HUD was to allow a pilot to see important stuff while looking through the windscreen for important stuff allowing intricate operations without taking the eye off either. That‘s a good thing. Ubuntu’s HUD is not.

rest here




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