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Taking MyahOS 2.0 for a little spin

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I was recently informed of the new release of MyahOS 2.0. I began my download last night and tested the system today. I paraphrased the developer, Jeremiah Cheatham, when I typed in our announcement, and as was said, MyahOS 2.0 is a completely new system rebuilt from the ground up using Slackware Current packages. It features the 2.6.15.3 test kernel and has patched in squashfs, unionfs, and bootsplash. It also sports the latest KDE 3.5.1 with the latest qt and xorg 6.9.0.

The developer went on to say,

"I used the 2.6.15.3 test kernel and patched in squashfs, unionfs, and bootsplash. So it has everything the stock kernel has, just some extras. I'm using the latest KDE 3.5.1 with the latest qt and xorg 6.9.0 This system looks and feels the exact same as 1.1 and 1.2 accept it's only looks, Like I said it shares none of the same packages or stripped down stuff from slax or klax. I used the whole packages with documents and all so nothing's missing. I also have a proper Kernel Source/Headers and Build packages all from Slackware Current. So people will be able to build packages from source against the system. Because I didn't strip the packages I was unable to place the kernel source or Open Office 2 on the CD like last time. But I will have them available for download. Everything that was on the CD before is still there in the same fashion. I also added Kino and Cinellera video editors. And the new Mozilla SeaMonkey is also there with all the media plugins, flash, java, Mplayerplug-in that firefox has. I also added Bittorrent. Once again I didn't leave any of the applications out. I threw in PouetChess for fun and also added in the libraries from the gaming CDs. For the most part the games should work but they're not all tested. I will be updating them. And there is a fresh new look to the boot sequence. I have used a Bootsplash so a 1024x768 screen is required. I have added the new ati and nvidia drivers, but the nvidia driver is currently untested."


        

        



As stated, MyahOS 2.0 did indeed come with all of KDE 3.5.1 and a few add-ins as well. For example, Myah is featuring Koffice as its office suite now, much like PCLinuxOS and some others, to save space. It's become a full featured alternative to OpenOffice and I believe we will be seeing more of this trend. As most of my readers are quite familiar with all that KDE offers, I basically took screenshots of other applications not usually included with the KDE desktop environment.

        

It's always nice when a distro comes with full video and plugin support. Many of the big commercial distros can't do this, so it's a welcome perk that we get from the smaller teams. MyahOS 2.0 comes with several video and cd players, such as xine, mplayer, xmms and totem, as you can see in the mm screenshot above. I had really good luck with the video players, each one working wonderfully. I did have to reconfigure xmms to use the associated directory for my drive, which turned out to be cdrom_hdc if memory serves. My sound card was automagically detected and configured, as was my video card (even if original resolution was set at 1782x1344). Big Grin

        

As stated most common plugins were present and I tested my most commonly used: java, flash, and mplugger. They worked wonderfully. The video did not come out in the screenshot, instead showing a blue screen, but it was in fact working as it should. Some of the many plug-ins are shown in the seamonkey screenshot above.

        

The only problems (or weirdness) I experienced was that all ext3 filesystems were mounted as ext2, reiserfs partitions weren't auto-mounted at all, and usb detection. I just as soon have none mounted, so a simple umount -a ext2 command unmounted all unnecessary partitions. No usb devices were detected and setup first boot and as such nothing usb worked. Second boot, I booted with the scanner powered on and some strangely named usb devices were made in /dev. KDE's kinfocenter correctly saw and reported these devices (first and second boot), but kooka and xsane wanted no part of them.

    

But all in all, MyahOS 2.0 was found to be a great Slack-based system. It was extremely stable and all applications opened and worked very well. I experienced no crashes or weird application behavior. The system was responsive and it performed very well. 3D acceleration worked out of the box here as did all the important video codecs and browser plug-ins. As usual the livecd format includes their user-friendly harddrive installation application.


The MyahOS site hasn't been updated at this time to reflect the new version, but I'm sure it's in the works. Keep an eye on the MyMyah site and download 2.0 HERE. I've posted some new screenshots in the GALLERY.


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