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Do Linux Novelty Desktops Threaten Linux Adoption?

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By now, most of you have likely heard about Canonical pulling official support for Kubuntu. It's hardly surprising, considering Canonical's push to get Unity not only on the desktop, but on tablets and TVs as well.
Any past desire to contribute officially to KDE has fallen by the wayside for Canonical. It's simply not a priority for them any longer. Instead, Canonical has decided that their efforts are best spent on what some have described as a novelty desktop environment for Ubuntu Linux.

Canonical's Ubuntu is hardly alone on this front. Linux Mint, with its Cinnamon desktop environment, is also spreading its wings using the Gnome shell as its base. It seems that some desktop Linux distributions are potentially "jumping the shark." Then again, perhaps both distributions are making a brilliant decision that will become more apparent in the near future. It remains to be seen which this situation will actually turn out.

Novelty desktop environments

The idea of distribution-specific desktop environments was bound to happen eventually. While most non-Ubuntu based distributions allow their users to select from a myriad of desktop choices, the increasing push for tighter desktop controls seems to be winning the hearts of some developers.

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