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CA Backs Single Open-Source License

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OSS

Hoping to bring some order to the chaotic system of open-source licenses, Computer Associates International Inc. is spearheading a campaign to create a single, common open-source license to which options can be added through a template.

he Template License is designed to help address the proliferation of open-source licenses that currently exist-more than 60 at last count-many of which have never been updated and are unenforceable, said Sam Greenblatt, a senior vice president at CA, in Islandia, N.Y.

The company took a hard look at its complex Trusted Open Source License and decided that it did not want to be in the licensing business.

"We want to be able to create a template that can deal with the issue of internationalization. Some 60 percent of all our Linux revenue will come from outside the United States, and some 95 percent of the [Open Source Initiative]-approved licenses are unenforceable outside the United States," Greenblatt said.

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re: This is a big deal.

Yeah, I shuddered when I read it too, I almost said something, but didn't trust my judgement. Thanks for the confirmation and your comment.

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