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Chrome only future for Flash on Linux

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Software

Adobe has announced that in future, the Flash Player for Linux will only be available through Google as part of the Google Chrome browser and not as a standalone download. The shipped plugin will also only support Chrome's plugin API. The changes will take effect after the release of Flash Player 11.2 later this year.

In a blog posting, Adobe said it had been working with Google on developing a replacement for the Netscape plug-in API that Flash Player currently uses, called PPAPI or Pepper. Pepper is designed to be a single modern API for plugins within the browser with an effective abstraction layer hiding the different types of browser and API.

Adobe has worked with Google on this as Flash Player.

rest here




Flash, Chrome and a Mole Hill

jeffhoogland.blogspot: In case you haven't heard yet Adobe made a blog post today detailing a new partnership with Google. If you haven't already follow my link above and read Adobe's post - it is only a few paragraphs. I've already seen this news reposted on several open-source news sites and honestly I think it is great deal of fuss over something that ultimately won't matter much.

I have a few reasons for saying this, here is my train of thought on the topic:

read here

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