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The Perfect Media Server - Ubuntu 11.10

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to install Ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric Ocelot) and all the programs needed for the perfect media server to download all your media and stream it to your PS3. This setup includes Sabnzbd+ (an Open Source Binary Newsreader written in Python), Sickbeard (a PVR for newsgroup users), Couch Potato (an automatic NZB and torrent downloader), Headphones (automatic music downloader for SABnzbd), and Serviio (a free media server).

http://www.howtoforge.com/the-perfect-media-server-ubuntu-11.10-sabnzbd-sickbeard-couch-potato-headphones-serviio

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

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Raspberry Pi, Linux Devices, and LEDE 17.01

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today's howtos

FSF announces a major overhaul of free software High Priority Projects List

The HPP list highlights projects of great strategic importance to the goal of freedom for all computer users. A committee of free software activists, assembled in 2014, spent a year soliciting feedback from the free software community for the latest revision of the list. "As the technological landscape has shifted over the last decade since the first version of the list was published, threats to users' freedom to use their computers on their own terms have changed enormously," said Benjamin Mako Hill, who is part of the High Priority Projects committee and also a member of the FSF's board of directors. "The updated High Priority Projects list is a description of the most important threats, and most critical opportunities, that free software faces in the modern computing landscape." Launched in 2005, the first version of the HPP list contained only four projects, three of them related to Java. Eighteen months later, Sun began to free Java users. Read more Also: Meet Guix at FOSDEM