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Why Does Kubuntu Suck?

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Ubuntu

Why does Kubuntu suck? I don’t think it sucks. However after reading a lot of comments recently on the Internet about the death of Kubuntu and KDE (sarcasm there) a lot of people think it does. I read stuff like:

* “Kubuntu is the worst distro ever!“
* “Kubuntu has been dead since day one“
* “Nobody cares about Kubuntu anyways“

If you are one of those people who have said something like the above recently, why? I want solid reasons and I don’t want to hear stuff like:

rest here




Kubuntu Sucks

Why does Kubuntu suck?

* The name sucks. REAL people would NEVER take it seriously - crash test out loud any conversation with the word "Kubuntu" and you'll feel ultra lame.

* The package manager is overly complicated and lacking simplicity and functionality - the most important piece of ubuntu's success.

* They're not as organized as Ubuntu with Ask Ubuntu, Brainstorm, Centralized Community Forums and a focus on simplicity and simple looks.

Actually, Kubuntu really plays a large role in ruining KDE's name to fame - every time I want to install KDE as a first-class DE Kubuntu is the only distribution that comes to mind - and every release it's terrible does exactly what the name implies - not live up to it's role model Ubuntu.

It's amazingly hard to find a KDE distro debian based - too bad KDE doesn't take on the challenge themselves and create an official distro.

PS: Now that Kubuntu is dropped from the Canonical family and part of Blue Systems - they really need to drop the name - it's just as bad as when Mandrake became Mandriva.

Re: Kubuntu

On the other hand, one can always install Synaptic under Kubuntu with sudo apt-get install synaptic. It's the fastest and simplest package manager I know.

Agreed on the name. But it's only a name.

Actually, I've installed the last three versions of Kubuntu on one of my home machines...and I find the KDE stuff has become better and better. (I Haven't yet installed Kubuntu "Precise Pangolin").

With Kubuntu's repository sharing with Ubuntu, the package depth and variety is amazing.

Yes, KDE Debian based distros are scarce.

And Kubuntu manages to keep its packages fairly up-to-date without becoming wildly unstable.

While not my preferred daily desktop distro, Kubuntu does have its good points.

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