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Ubuntu's Bold Mobile Gambit

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

There's no denying the magnitude of Linux's impact on the world of personal computing so far, but you know something has changed when headlines like the ones we saw last week begin appearing.

"Ubuntu for Android: This, ladies and gentlemen, is the future of computing" read one, for example.

"Ubuntu for Android shows us the future of computing" read another.

"How RIM could learn from Ubuntu, and why it needs to before it's too late" was yet another.

"Ubuntu crests new wave of mobile computing solutions" was the bold proclamation over at The Guardian.

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