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The Linux Setup - Terrence O’Brien, Engadget

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Linux
Hardware
Interviews

I suspected Terrence O’Brien was a Linux user when I started noticing he seemed to be behind just about all of Engadget’s Linux coverage. It turns out I was right about Terrence. Not only that, he gets a lot of work done through his Ubuntu setup. Also, his dream setup is pretty great. I think I’m stealing it for my dream.

1. Who are you, and what do you do?

I’m an associate editor at Engadget and former senior contributor to Switched.com. I’m also an avid outdoorsman, nerd from birth and serial hobbyist.

2. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

Ubuntu. My first exposure to Linux was through Red Hat, which my father brought home since he had to learn it for his job. But, let’s just say things did not go smoothly. It wasn’t until years later, when I was trying to milk the last bit of life out of my almost six-year-old ThinkPad 600X that I decided to give Linux another shot. That was back in 2005, and the new hot distro on the scene was a rather ugly thing slathered in brown with an alliterative code name. That, much like my introduction via Red Hat, was also a rough experience — but, oddly, I was hooked. Since that day Ubuntu has not only been my Linux distro of choice, but my primary OS.

3. What software do you depend upon with this distribution?




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