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Top features for desktop users of Fedora 17

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Linux

Like previous editions of Fedora, Fedora 17 will ship with several major feature enhancements. Some will be of interest only to enterprise users, while others will be mainly for desktop users. Other features will, of course, appeal to the needs of both enterprise and desktop users. Here is a list of the top features that desktop users should expect on Fedora 17 when the final stable version is released in May.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/02/29/top-features-for-desktop-users-of-fedora-17/

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