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The 'Mandriva Wars' and More

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The Cyber Cynic podcast with Steven J. Vaughn-Nichols looks at the popular French-based Linux distributor Mandriva and its troubles in eWEEK Podcast #47.

Linux Watch Editor Steven J. Vaughn-Nichols looks at a number of issues this week, including the "Mandriva Wars."

It's sad that the popular French-based Linux distributor has errupted into infighting with its community and one of its founders, Gael Duval, fighting with the company over his firing. Unfortunately, it's just the way of businesses as they grow from being technology-first companies to being business-first companies.

eWEEK Podcast #47.

Mandriva Wars

I don't know that I would call it a "war" exactly, but many in the Mandriva Club (myself included) believe that this is a clear sign that club members won't count for much from now on.

Steven J. Vaughn-Nichols podcast describes the situation very clearly.

I have 9 months left to go before my club membership expires. It's becoming more doubtful by the day that I will renew that membership. In fact, when it expires, I'll likely start sending that money to PCLinuxOS.

That's because I just switched my *main* machine over to PCLinuxOS this weekend (Since PCLinuxOS was originally a fork of Mandrake 9.2, it's admittedly not much of a stretch. The best thing about it is I now have so little tinkering to do to get things "just right"--Tex and the PCLinuxOS gang use really sensible preset configuration defaults).

Like many, I first found pclinuxonline.com when Tex was building KDE RPM's for Mandrake Linux years ago. I had done a google search for Mandrake RPMs, and there was pclinuxonline.com. Tex kept pumping out these incredible KDE RPMs and kept us all up to date--and they were so much better than Mandrake's official KDE RPMs.

As an aside, I also tried Kubuntu--installed it on my laptop a couple of days ago. I'm not tremendously impressed--and I don't quite understand Ubuntu/Kubuntu's enormous popularity. Oh well, each to thine own.

Back to Mandriva. Mandriva's 2006 release was buggy. It came out just after KDE 3.5.0 was released, and had KDE 3.4.x. In all that time, Mandriva never has released a 3.5.x KDE version for version 2006. Nada. No KDE upgrade. This just doesn't make it.

I wish Mandriva well. But they'll have to do some incredible work to get my $$$ again (and yes, I have sent some money to PCLinuxOS).

Gary Frankenbery

RE: Mandriva Wars

Gary,

Sorry for speaking about GNOME -- I don't use KDE, except when I'm forced to.

1. Does the Club membership provided you with the XMas edition of MDK 2006? Was it better than the official, purchasable one? (Not being a member, I can't tell.)
At least, the XMas special edition should have GNOME 2.12.

2. Being it unofficial, but is KDE 3.5 from http://seerofsouls.com/mandriva/2006/i586/ working?

3. The fame of Kubuntu is totally unjustified! It's just a KDE clone of Ubuntu, but I can't see what shines in it either.
The "original" Ubuntu however benefits from the fact 4.10 Warty actually was a good working GNOME 2.8 incarnation. And 5.04 Hoary was quite a good GNOME 2.10 too. After that and besides that... I guess Ubuntu got spread because of the people liking to receive free CDs by post! (I can't explain the hype if not this way out.)

RE: Re: Mandriva Wars

AFAIK the Christmas Club Edition of Mandriva available to Mandriva club members was the same as official purchasable (Powerpack) version. Anyway, the Christmas Club edition came with Gnome 2.10. This has not been updated.

Glad to hear that others share my opinion on Ubuntu/Kubuntu--it's ok, but nothing special.

I did not try to install seerofsouls (hawkwind's) KDE 3.5.1 RPMs on my Mandriva box. Some have had success with it, others haven't. Those KDE RPM's are backported from the Mandriva Cooker (development version) to Mandriva 2006. I would say that one would need to read their howto very carefully, and follow it to the letter.

The more I use PCLinuxOS on my home system, the more I'm glad I made the transition. PCLinuxOS has its faults, but its running great for me.

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