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The GNOME 2 Zombie

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Software

In the past year, the GNOME 2 release series has become the zombie of the free desktop.

Although replaced by GNOME 3, it refuses to die. Its mourners flock to Xfce, in which they see a resemblance of the deceased. It lives an undead existence in a crippled version in the current GNOME's fallback mode.

More recently, Linux Mint has taken on Dr. Frankenstein's role, trying to revive GNOME 2 in MATE, and reincarnate it as Cinnamon.

Since most of these efforts are not supported by the GNOME project, they have an air of heroism. Users are insisting on having what they want, no matter what developers decree, and I have to admire their persistence.

However, I find myself asking: What was so great about the GNOME 2 series?

Rest here




KDE 4 Uber Alles!

The author makes it clear in the beginning that he uses KDE4, but the clarification is unneccessary, his bias is quite clear.

He ignores the fact that GNOME 3 is in about the same state that KDE 4.1 was after the switch from KDE 3.x to KDE 4.x and that many long-time KDE users complained about KDE 4 for similar reasons to his complaints about GNOME 3. Go back and read articles from that time for comparison.

At least I liked some of his comments about what had been wrong with stock GNOME 2.x

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