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How does one report spam comments?

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Hey, all --

Just a quick question: How does one report spam? I have something about handbags (Longchamp Bags -- I think the same item is below in this forum) as a comment to my blog item posted by tuxmachines here:

http://www.tuxmachines.org/node/56956

While I am grateful for the post, I'm sure that handbags have nothing to do with the blog's subject matter.

Thanks for some guidance on this.

Larry Cafiero
Larry the Free Software Guy
http://larrythefreesoftwareguy.wordpress.com

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