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Original Articles from 2011

This began as a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org, either by me or someone else, but it has since morphed into a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org and the articles I've had published elsewhere.

  1. Bodhi Linux Gets Christmas Update - Dec 23, 2011
  2. Help Squash LibreOffice Bugs, Become Hero - Dec 21, 2011
  3. Big Winners and Losers of 2011 - Dec 15, 2011
  4. Blender 2.61 Released - Dec 14, 2012
  5. Children's Distro Releases Preview - Dec 13, 2011
  6. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.1 Risk Report - Dec 8, 2011
  7. GNOME 3 Gets New Extension Website - Dec 2, 2011
  8. TDF Celebrates 100 Extensions - Nov 30, 2011
  9. Mandriva Introduces New Media Player - Nov 29, 2011
  10. Kororaa 16 Beta Released - Nov 28, 2011
  11. Mageia 2 On Its Way - Nov 28, 2011
  12. Get Some LibreOffice Gear - Nov 18, 2011
  13. Going Incognito - Nov 17, 2011
  14. UEFI Won't Trouble Linux Users Much - Nov 15, 2011
  15. openSUSE 12.1 Gone Gold, Release Wednesday - Nov 14, 2011
  16. Sabayon Releases Even More Choice - Nov 10, 2011
  17. Gentoo Christens Shiny New Wiki - Nov 9, 2011
  18. Fuduntu Turns One, Forks Fedora Nov 8, 2011
  19. Fedora 16 Declared Gold, Release Tomorrow - Nov 7, 2011
  20. Linux Mint 12 to Blend GNOMEs 2 & 3 - Nov 4, 2011
  21. openSUSE 12.1 RC2 Released, Stokes Interest - Nov 03, 2011
  22. New LibreOffice Extension Website Live - Oct 28, 2011
  23. Is Firefox Released too Often? - Oct 27, 2011
  24. Kwort is Still Around? - Oct 26, 2011
  25. A Puppy for Slackers - Oct 25, 2011
  26. Mageia 2 Delayed a Month - Oct 24, 2011
  27. openSUSE 12.1 RC 1 Out - 23 Days to Go - Oct 24, 2011
  28. Mandriva 2011 Powerpack is Coming - Oct 20, 2011
  29. openSUSE Delayed, Ubuntu Birthday, Sabayon Releases - Oct 19, 2011
  30. Enough Ubuntu, YET? - Oct 19, 2011
  31. The Document Foundation Thinking Beyond Desktop - Oct 14, 2011
  32. Not Enough Ubuntu Yet? - Oct 13, 2011
  33. Sabayon 7 Brings Linux Heaven - Oct 12, 2011
  34. Another Linux Project Hacked - Oct 11, 2011
  35. Crazy Fan Geeko-gimps his Ride - Oct 10, 2011
  36. KDE to Celebrate 15th Birthday - Oct 05, 2011
  37. KDE to Say Buh-Bye to Screensavers - Oct 03, 2011
  38. No One Uses 32-bit Anymore... Right? - Sep 30, 2011
  39. FSF Relaunches Software Directory - Sep 29, 2011
  40. LibreOffice Celebrates First Anniversary - Sep 28, 2011
  41. PulseAudio Turns 1.0 - Sep 27, 2011
  42. Linux Mint Computer Case Stickers - Sep 26, 2011
  43. Fedora 16 Delayed by Two Weeks Too - Sep 23, 2011
  44. openSUSE 12.1 Beta Delayed Two Weeks - Sep 22, 2011
  45. Kororaa 15 Unleashed - Sep 20, 2011
  46. Happy Birthday Mageia! - Sep 19, 2011
  47. Linux Mint Debian 201109 Released - Sep 16, 2011
  48. PC-BSD 9.0 on its Way - Sep 15, 2011
  49. Do You Think Linux is Secure? - Sep 14, 2011
  50. Mark of a Good Distro - Sep 9, 2011
  51. Mageia Needs Artists - Sep 8, 2011
  52. Bacon Justifies Ubuntu Decisions - Sep 7, 2011
  53. Your Favorite Browsers - Sep 1, 2011
  54. Oh No, Kernel.org was Hacked - Aug 31, 2011
  55. KDE Performance Boost Ahead - Aug 30, 2011
  56. New Distribution: Dream Studio Introduced - Aug 29, 2011
  57. My Favorite Little Games - Aug 25, 2011
  58. Gentoo Gets an Installer - Aug 24, 2011
  59. Countdown to Mandriva 2011, Codename Announced - Aug 19, 2011
  60. Dead Cyborg Brings Excitement, At First - Aug 18, 2011
  61. Do You Like Tux the Penguin? - Aug 17, 2011
  62. GIMP Single-Window Mode Almost Ready, Hardware Acceleration Planned - Aug 15, 2011
  63. Ultimate Edition 3.0 "Gamers" Released - Aug 12, 2011
  64. ConnochaetOS 0.9.0 Released to Replace DeLi - Aug 11, 2011
  65. Does Linus Run Linux Mint? - Aug 9, 2011
  66. Gentoo Releases 11.2 LiveDVD to Crickets - Aug 8, 2011
  67. KNOPPIX 6.7.0 Delivers a Few Surprises - Aug 5, 2011
  68. Torvalds Dumps GNOME for Xfce - Aug 3, 2011
  69. LibreOffice Developer Glimpse Proves Balance - Aug 2, 2011
  70. New Pup is Born, Dolphin 2.0 - Aug 1, 2011
  71. Mandriva 2011 Almost Ready, RC2 Released - July 28, 2011
  72. Mandriva's Dodonov Leaves Goodbye Gifts - July 26, 2011
  73. Spotlight on Linux: Linvo GNU/Linux - July 26, 2011
  74. Zorin OS Releases a "Lite" Version - July 25, 2011
  75. Get a Glimpse of Unstable Apps in Ubuntu Without Risk - July 22, 2011
  76. Oracle Fires Another Shot Over Red Hat's Bow - July 21, 2011
  77. Can We Trust Microsoft? Part 2 - The Video - July 20, 2011
  78. Can We Trust Microsoft? - July 19, 2011
  79. Another day, Another PCLOS - Xfce Edition 2011-07 - July 18, 2011
  80. Mageia 2 Release Details Revealed - July 18, 2011
  81. Introducing Linvo GNU/Linux - July 15, 2011
  82. PCLinuxOS 2011.07 MiniMe KDE Released - July 14, 2011
  83. Mandriva 2010.x Reaches End of Desktop Support (updated) - July 13, 2011
  84. Linux Mint 11 KDE to be Based on Debian, Maybe - July 11, 2011
  85. Closer Look at Mageia 1 - July 8, 2011
  86. Plasma Active Trims Down - July 7, 2011
  87. Eugeni Dodonov Sails Away, Quits Mandriva - July 6, 2011
  88. The Mistake that is Upgrading to KDEPIM 4.6.0 - July 5, 2011
  89. Mandriva 2011 RC 1 Available - Quick Look - June 29, 2011
  90. Mandriva 2011 RC 1 Released, Almost - June 28, 2011
  91. PCLinuxOS 2011.6 Released - June 27, 2011
  92. Quake Turns 15, Frag On! - June 24, 2011
  93. Bitcoin - I Hardly Knew Ya - June 24, 2011
  94. Debian Dumps OpenOffice for LibreOffice - June 23, 2011
  95. openSUSE 12.1 On its Way - June 22, 2011
  96. Is Ubuntu on the way out? - June 20, 2011
  97. Would You like GNOME 2.32 on Fedora 15? - June 17, 2011
  98. LibreOffice 3.3.3 Released for the Cautious - June 16, 2011
  99. SUSE, Red Hat, and FSF on New TDF Board - June 15, 2011
  100. Sabayon 6 to be Released this Week - June 14, 2011
  101. Spotlight on Linux: Mageia 1 - June 14, 2011
  102. ClearOS - Now for Workstations Too - June 13, 2011
  103. IPv6 - Today or the Future? - June 9, 2011
  104. The Fruits of DEX Begin to Emerge - June 8, 2011
  105. Zenix GNU/Linux - Fun, Fast, Different - June 7, 2011
  106. Is Oracle Holding Back OpenOffice Files from Apache? - Jun 7, 2011
  107. The Open Source Office Software Sector Heats Up - Jun 6, 2011
  108. The Magic is Born -> Mageia 1 Released - June 1, 2011
  109. Kororaa 14 - Linux Mint of Fedora? - May 31, 2011
  110. Fedora Blogs Going Bye-Bye? - May 30, 2011
  111. Linux Mint 11 - Vital Service or Prolonging Agony? - May 26, 2011
  112. KAlarm - A Handy App that Gets Little Attention - May 25, 2011
  113. Fedora 15 Released, GNOME 3 Looks Good - May 24, 2011
  114. Unity Coming to openSUSE After All - May 20, 2011
  115. Fedora 15 Goes Gold - May 18, 2011
  116. Mageia 1 RC Available, Final Not Far Off - May 17, 2011
  117. Mono Continues without Novell / Attachmate - May 16, 2011
  118. DNSMasq - Best Way to Surf Internet - May 13, 2011
  119. Bye Bye Skype, Top 3 Free Replacements - May 12, 2011
  120. Next Gen KDEPIM Coming in June with KDE 4.6.4 - May 11, 2011
  121. LibreOffice 3.4 Will Have Native Support for Ubuntu Global Menu - May 10, 2011
  122. Ubuntu 11.04, Unity Released to Mixed Reactions - May 6, 2011
  123. SimplyMEPIS 11.0 Released, Looks Good - May 6, 2011
  124. A Sneak Peek at Upcoming Linux Mint 11 - May 5, 2011
  125. antiX M11 is Still Quite Impressive - May 4, 2011
  126. Linux as Social Justice Symbol - I Think Not - May 3, 2011
  127. Debian May Begin Rolling Release Branch - May 2, 2011
  128. Another LibreOffice Developmental Release Emerges - April 29, 2011
  129. 514cKW4r3 1337 R313453d - 700 (00L Ph0R 5(|-|00L - April 28, 2011
  130. Pinta 1.0 Released, Looking Good - April 27, 2011
  131. Mageia 1 Beta 2 Released - April 26, 2011
  132. Spotlight on Linux: Toorox - April 26, 2011
  133. Breaking in a Kingston SSD - April 25, 2011
  134. LibreOffice 3.4 Beta 2 Released - April 22, 2011
  135. Offline Two Days - What Did I Miss? - April 21, 2011
  136. FVWM Manager Sees First Release in Five Years - April 20, 2011
  137. Mandriva 2011 Beta 2 - The Return of XKill - April 19, 2011
  138. OpenOffice and LibreOffice Won't Be Kissing and Making Up - April 18, 2011
  139. LibreOffice 3.4 Beta 1 Available, Oracle Unchains OpenOffice - April 18, 2011
  140. SimplyMepis Shaping Up - 11.0 RC 2 Released - April 15, 2011
  141. Torvalds Honored by Gaggle of Lawyers - April 15, 2011
  142. Zorin OS Finds a Home on Rotatable Notebook - April 13, 2011
  143. Testing Plasma Active - April 12, 2011
  144. KDE's New Project for Portable Devices - April 11, 2011
  145. Have You Heard of AUSTRUMI Linux? - April 7, 2011
  146. Future openSUSE Versioning Decided - April 6, 2011
  147. The GNOME Desktop Project Unleashes GNOME 3.0 - April 6, 2011
  148. Are You Looking Forward to GNOME 3? - April 5, 2011
  149. Graesslin Has Compositing Dreams, But is it Yours? - April 4, 2011
  150. Spotlight on Linux: Supergamer Supreme 2.5 - Mar 31, 2011
  151. Particularly Exciting Week in Linux - Mar 30, 2011
  152. New Mageia Forums Bring Community Together - Mar 29, 2011
  153. The Document Foundation Marks Six Months of Freedom - Mar 28, 2011
  154. LibreOffice Rolls Out the Updates, Latest 3.3.2 - Mar 25, 2011
  155. GNOME Shell 3.0 Nears Release - Mar 24, 2011
  156. The Board Makes Progress, Now with Distro Packages - Mar 23, 2011
  157. Did You Know there was a Fork of MPlayer? - Mar 22, 2011
  158. Mingle with openSUSE-ites on connect - Mar 22, 2011
  159. DEX: Bridging Gaps Between Debian and Derivatives - Mar 21, 2011
  160. Lessons Learned from Canonical, Banshee, and GNOME - Mar 17, 2011
  161. Mandriva Releases 2011 Beta 1 - Mar 16, 2011
  162. Mageia Moves Forward, Releases Alpha 2 - Mar 15, 2011
  163. KDE 4.6.1 Almost Perfect - Mar 14, 2011
  164. openSUSE Thinking about Naming Change - Mar 11, 2011
  165. openSUSE 11.4 Turned out Really Great - Mar 11, 2011
  166. Great New Edutainment Application for Kids: Color it by Numbers - Mar 9, 2011
  167. Gentoo Releases New LiveDVD - Mar 9, 2011
  168. Linux and The Crashy Firefox 4 - Mar 9, 2011
  169. FreeBSD and PC-BSD Release New Versions - Mar 7, 2011
  170. Adventures in Debian - Mar 4, 2011
  171. Spotlight on Linux: Debian GNU/Linux 6.0 "Squeeze" - Mar 3, 2011
  172. What is Your Favorite Desktop? - Mar 2, 2011
  173. Why Did They Take my GNOME Buttons Away? - Mar 1, 2011
  174. Who Contributes the Most to LibreOffice? - Mar 1, 2011
  175. The Document Foundation Reaches Goal of €50,000 - Feb 25, 2011
  176. Ubuntu Compromises on Banshee Revenue Recipients - Feb 24, 2011
  177. GNOME 3 Almost Ready, or is It - Feb 23, 2011
  178. Amazon.com Includes Linux Users in new Movie Streaming Service - Feb 22, 2011
  179. Follow Ubuntu Progress at a Glance, or Not - Feb 21, 2011
  180. LibreOffice Raises €10000 for Foundation in One Day - Feb 17, 2011
  181. Fedora, openSUSE Give up on Unity - Feb 15, 2011
  182. openSUSE to Celebrate 11.4 with Virtual Dance Party - Feb 15, 2011
  183. Mageia Announces First Alpha Release - Feb 14, 2011
  184. LibreOffice Sees First Update Already - Feb 11, 2011
  185. New GTK+3 is Released - Feb 10, 2011
  186. SimplyMEPIS 11.0 Starting to Look Good - Feb 9, 2011
  187. Mandriva Linux 2011TP - Quick Look (by gfranken) - Feb 8, 2011
  188. Is PCLinuxOS on the Ropes? - Feb 7, 2011
  189. Debian 6.0 "Squeeze" Released, Updated Website - Feb 5, 2011
  190. Does The Document Foundation Support OOXML? - Feb 4, 2011
  191. Where's My Mageia ISO? - Feb 3, 2011
  192. Nelson Continues Importing Ubuntu to openSUSE - Feb 2, 2011
  193. Fedora Goes to the Dogs - Hot Dogs That Is - Feb 1, 2011
  194. The New Features in LibreOffice 3.3 - Feb 1, 2011
  195. Mandriva 2011 Delayed Due to Major Changes - Jan 31, 2011
  196. What's Next for LibreOffice? - Jan 27, 2011
  197. Spotlight on Linux: Puppy Linux 5.2 - Jan 27, 2011
  198. OpenOffice.org 3.3 Released to Deaf Ears - Jan 26, 2011
  199. The Document Foundation Unleashes First LibreOffice Release - Jan 25, 2011
  200. One Package Manager for them All - Jan 24, 2011
  201. Popular Free *BSDs in Full Development - Jan 24, 2011
  202. Pardus 2011, Independent Distro Releases Latest and Greatest - Jan 22, 2011
  203. New Linux Distribution Brings Goodies to Debian - Jan 20, 2011
  204. Debian 6 Expected by February 6 - Jan 19
  205. Interesting Twist in the openSUSE Board Elections - Jan 18, 2011
  206. OpenOffice.org and LibreOffice Release Candidates Duke It Out - Jan 18, 2011
  207. Loss of Installer Dampens Xfce 4.8 Release - Jan 17, 2011
  208. openSUSE Board Forced to Terminate Membership - Jan 14, 2011
  209. Fedora Board Proposes Project Goals - Jan 13, 2011
  210. Punny Name, Serious Distro - Jan 11, 2011
  211. Mageia Alpha 0 on Track for January Release, Joins OIN - Jan 11, 2011
  212. Boot Issues Plague SimplyMepis 11 Development - Jan 10, 2011
  213. Is the Debian 6.0 "Squeeze" Release Upon Us? - January 8, 2011
  214. DACA Could Mean Fewer Bugs in Debian - January 5, 2011










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    Due to a known bug in upstream Linux 4.18, users with older multi-core x86 CPUs (Core 2 Duo and earlier?) may not correctly boot up with linux-libre 4.18 when using the default clocksource.
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LWN's Latest (Today Outside Paywall) Articles About the Kernel, Linux

  • Toward better handling of hardware vulnerabilities
    From the kernel development community's point of view, hardware vulnerabilities are not much different from the software variety: either way, there is a bug that must be fixed in software. But hardware vendors tend to take a different view of things. This divergence has been reflected in the response to vulnerabilities like Meltdown and Spectre which was seen by many as being severely mismanaged. A recent discussion on the Kernel Summit discussion list has shed some more light on how things went wrong, and what the development community would like to see happen when the next hardware vulnerability comes around. The definitive story of the response to Meltdown and Spectre has not yet been written, but a fair amount of information has shown up in bits and pieces. Intel was first notified of the problem in July 2017, but didn't get around to telling anybody in the the Linux community about it until the end of October. When that disclosure happened, Intel did not allow the community to work together to fix it; instead each distributor (or other vendor) was mostly left on its own and not allowed to talk to the others. Only at the end of December, right before the disclosure (and the year-end holidays), were members of the community allowed to talk to each other. The results of this approach were many, and few were good. The developers charged with responding to these problems were isolated and under heavy stress for two months; they still have not been adequately thanked for the effort they put in. Many important stakeholders, including distributions like Debian and the "tier-two" cloud providers, were not informed at all prior to the general disclosure and found themselves scrambling. Different distributors shipped different fixes, many of which had to be massively revised before entry into the mainline kernel. When the dust settled, there was a lot of anger left simmering in its wake.
  • Writing network flow dissectors in BPF
    Network packet headers contain a great deal of information, but the kernel often only needs a subset of that information to be able to perform filtering or associate any given packet with a flow. The piece of code that follows the different layers of packet encapsulation to find the important data is called a flow dissector. In current Linux kernels, the flow dissector is written in C. A patch set has been proposed recently to implement it in BPF with the clear goal of improving security, flexibility, and maybe even performance.
  • Coscheduling: simultaneous scheduling in control groups
    The kernel's CPU scheduler must, as its primary task, determine which process should be executing in each of a system's processors at any given time. Making an optimal decision involves juggling a number of factors, including the priority (and scheduling classes) of the runnable processes, NUMA locality, cache locality, latency minimization, control-group policies, power management, overall fairness, and more. One might think that throwing another variable into the mix — and a complex one at that — would not be something anybody would want to attempt. The recent coscheduling patch set from Jan Schönherr does exactly that, though, by introducing the concept of processes that should be run simultaneously. The core idea behind coscheduling is the marking of one or more control groups as containing processes that should be run together. If one process in a coscheduled group is running on a specific set of CPUs (more on that below), only processes from that group will be allowed to run on those CPUs. This rule holds even to the point of forcing some of the CPUs to go idle if the given control group lacks runnable processes, regardless of whether processes outside the group are runnable. Why might one want to do such a thing? Schönherr lists four motivations for this work, the first of which is virtualization. That may indeed be the primary motivation, given that Schönherr is posting from an Amazon address, and Amazon is rumored to be running a virtualized workload or two. A virtual machine usually contains multiple processes that interact with each other; these machines will run more efficiently (and with lower latencies) if those processes can run simultaneously. Coscheduling would ensure that all of a virtual machine's processes are run together, maximizing locality and minimizing the latencies of the interactions between them.
  • Machine learning and stable kernels
    There are ways to get fixes into the stable kernel trees, but they require humans to identify which patches should go there. Sasha Levin and Julia Lawall have taken a different approach: use machine learning to distinguish patches that fix bugs from others. That way, all bug-fix patches could potentially make their way into the stable kernels. Levin and Lawall gave a talk describing their work at the 2018 Open Source Summit North America in Vancouver, Canada. Levin began with a quick introduction to the stable tree and how patches get into it. When a developer fixes a bug in a patch they can add a "stable tag" to the commit or send a mail to the stable mailing list; Greg Kroah-Hartman will then pick up the fix, evaluate it, and add it to the stable tree. But that means that the stable tree is only getting the fixes that are pointed out to the stable maintainers. No one has time to check all of the commits to the kernel for bug fixes but, in an ideal world, all of the bug fixes would go into the stable kernels. Missing out on some fixes means that the stable trees will have more security vulnerabilities because the fixes often close those holes—even if the fixer doesn't realize it.
  • Trying to get STACKLEAK into the kernel
    The STACKLEAK kernel security feature has been in the works for quite some time now, but has not, as yet, made its way into the mainline. That is not for lack of trying, as Alexander Popov has posted 15 separate versions of the patch set since May 2017. He described STACKLEAK and its tortuous path toward the mainline in a talk [YouTube video] at the 2018 Linux Security Summit. STACKLEAK is "an awesome security feature" that was originally developed by The PaX Team as part of the PaX/grsecurity patches. The last public version of the patch set was released in April 2017 for the 4.9 kernel. Popov set himself on the goal of getting STACKLEAK into the kernel shortly after that; he thanked both his employer (Positive Technologies) and his family for giving him working and free time to push STACKLEAK. The first step was to extract STACKLEAK from the more than 200K lines of code in the grsecurity/PaX patch set. He then "carefully learned" about the patch and what it does "bit by bit". He followed the usual path: post the patch, get feedback, update the patch based on the feedback, and then post it again. He has posted 15 versions and "it is still in progress", he said.

PostgreSQL 11: something for everyone

PostgreSQL 11 had its third beta release on August 9; a fourth beta (or possibly a release candidate) is scheduled for mid-September. While the final release of the relational database-management system (currently slated for late September) will have something new for many users, its development cycle was notable for being a period when the community hit its stride in two strategic areas: partitioning and parallelism. Partitioning and parallelism are touchstones for major relational database systems. Proprietary database vendors manage to extract a premium from a minority of users by upselling features in these areas. While PostgreSQL has had some of these "high-tier" items for many years (e.g., CREATE INDEX CONCURRENTLY, advanced replication functionality), the upcoming release expands the number considerably. I may be biased as a PostgreSQL major contributor and committer, but it seems to me that the belief that community-run database system projects are not competitive with their proprietary cousins when it comes to scaling enterprise workloads has become just about untenable. Read more