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Why Firefox Could Become a Top Browser Again

Filed under
Moz/FF

For the web browser, 2011 was an astonishing year. Google fundamentally changed our perception of what a web browser is and what it should do. According to StatCounter, Chrome gained 42.5 percent market share or 11.59 points, while IE lost 19.0 percent or 7.35 points, and Firefox lost 21.4 percent or 5.4 points. (For the remainder of this article I will only consider data provided by StatCounter, as it is the most comprehensive browser market share data set that is freely accessible.) You can love or hate Chrome, but there is little denying that Google's Chrome strategy, a combination of rapid browser development, convenient software delivery through silent updates, backwards compatibility, quick security fixes, and high-profile advertising, is working quite well.

Many people have asked me about the current browser environment and which browser would be the most stable alternative, especially for business use. When I ran the numbers, there was a surprising result that looked especially interesting for Mozilla. Before we look specifically into Firefox, let's first look at the status quo of the browser market with a six-month outlook.

rest here

Also: The BIG browser benchmark: Chrome 18 vs Opera 11 vs Firefox 11 vs IE9 vs Safari 5

And: Mozilla releases BrowserQuest - A free online role playing game




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today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: KDE (Akonadi, KWin)

  • Akonadi for e-mail needs to die
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  • Virtual keyboard support in KWin/Wayland 5.7
    Over the last weeks I worked on improved input device support in KWin/Wayland and support for virtual keyboard. KWin 5.7 will integrate the new QtVirtualKeyboard module which is now available under GPLv3. For us this means that we have access to a high quality QML based keyboard. For Qt it means that the virtual keyboard is exposed to more users and thanks to the open source nature it means that we can upstream fixes.
  • Virtual Keyboard Support For KWin / KDE Wayland 5.7
    The latest KWin/Wayland hacking project by Martin Gräßlin is adding virtual keyboard support to KWin for the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.7 release. This virtual keyboard support is powered by the QtVirtualKeyboard module and provides a high-quality, QML-based keyboard that will work on KWin/Wayland when no hardware keyboard is available. Implementing this virtual keyboard support with Wayland compatibility was actually quite a feat, but has now become a reality thanks to the work by Martin.

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