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Emu Software Enters Canadian Open Source Market

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Savoir-Faire Linux and Emu Software: An alliance to guide you into the Linux World

Cary, North Carolina, USA & Montreal, Quebec, Canada – March 21, 2006 – Marking a major step in its expansion in North America, Emu Software, makers of the NetDirector Open Source Configuration Management system, today announces a key partnership with Savoir-Faire Linux, a leading Linux migration consultant in Canada.

“I am very excited about our partnership with Savoir-Faire Linux” said Allen Fisher, Emu's VP of Sales. “With their strong track record as customer's trusted advisor leveraging Linux and Open Source solutions to meet business challenges, Savoir-Faire Linux exemplifies the kind of partner Emu Software wants to work with.”

As part of the relationship, Savoir-Faire Linux will provide French language translation of Emu Software's NetDirector Configuration Management System. “This aspect of our partnership with Savoir-Faire Linux exemplifies a key benefit to business technology users of the Open Source model,” said Greg Wallace, Emu's Chief Marketing Officer. “Emu actively supports our partners in customizing NetDirector to meet their clients' needs. With Savoir-Faire, the first step of customization is the French language translation. Future steps will likely include Savoir-Faire developing NetDirector modules to manage customer's unique applications running on Linux. Through this kind of two-way partnership, NetDirector will very quickly be extended as a configuration management system to meet more and more customer's requirements.”

“Taking part in the development of NetDirector is the best way for us to deploy and customize it to the specific needs of canadian and quebecer companies and public administrations,” remarked Savoir-Faire's Partnership Manager Maxime Chambreuil. “With NetDirector, Emu Software provides IT departments with the appropriate Open Source administration solution to launch massive deployments of Linux servers and manage their configurations. With Savoir-Faire's Open Source expertise and Emu Software's strong NetDirector solution, canadian businesses will be guaranteed to make their move to Linux a big success.”

About Savoir-Faire Linux

Savoir-Faire Linux combines the expertise of high-level professionals and ensures complete and ready to use Open-Source solutions at the cutting edge of technology. Based in Montreal, Savoir-Faire Linux works with leading-edge technology partners and boasts high-profile references for their Linux migration services and approved training and consulting services. For more information, please visit www.savoirfairelinux.com

About Emu Software

Emu Software, Inc. is the maker of NetDirector, an extensible management framework that brings features such as rollback, policy-based administration, multi-server changes, and an ergonomic interface to open source systems. Emu Software is an IBM Business Partner and is designated as Red Hat Ready. Emu Software strives to deliver the leading cross-platform, cross-distribution configuration management solution for open source services such as Apache, Bind, Sendmail, and many others. Emu Software is headquartered in Cary, N.C. For more information, please visit www.emusoftware.com

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NetDirector is a trademark of Emu Software, Inc. in the U.S. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. All other trademarks herein are property of their respective owners.

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