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Linux Mint Update Pack 4 is out

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Linux

Update Pack 4 was released as the “latest” update pack today. If you’re not using Linux Mint Debian, please ignore this post.

In Update Pack 4, the following significant changes occur which might cause regressions on your system:

1. Gnome 2 gets “upgraded” to Gnome Shell
2. The Linux kernel is upgraded to version 3.2

rest here




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