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Meet the Linux Tycoon tycoon

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
Gaming

If the idea of a game about managing a hypothetical Linux distribution doesn't sound like your idea of a good time, you probably aren't alone. In fact, you'd probably guess, if you had to, that no such game existed.

Linux Tycoon, however, is very real, and has garnered a startling amount of attention in the few days that it's been available in beta. It's a management sim in the tradition of Roller Coaster Tycoon or Sim Tower. Players select software packages to be part of their distro and tinker to find the best possible combination of functionality while keeping its total size at a reasonable level and corralling bugs with the help of volunteers and paid staff. Success is measured in market share compared to completely fictitious competitors like "Ooboontoo" and "Plebian."

Creator Bryan Lunduke says the attention his project has gotten is "dumbfounding." (He's already been written up at Boing Boing and Engadget, among other places.)

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