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Dream Linux 5 - New and Different

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Linux

How about something different for a Friday? Dream Linux is a distribution which I was watching some time ago, but it seemed to stall at release 4 Beta 6. I was pleased to find recently that it is not dead or abandoned, as I had feared, but the developers had decided to go back and make a fresh start for Dream Linux 5. There is a Message to All on their web page which explains what they have done, and why. The Dream linux home page (note the .info domain) gives a lot more information, of course, and explains the two installation options, either a "Full Install" to a disk drive or partition, or a "Persistent Install" to an external flash storage device.

After downloading the full installation image, I was pleased to find that even though the installation instructions don't mention it, I was able to make a bootable USB stick with the excellent unetbootin utility, and install from that with no problem. The installer seems to be their own creation, and although it is not as extensive or as fancy as many others, it seemed easy to use and understand, and it got the job done. It did not have any trouble with my extensively partitioned disk, as several others have had lately. Once the installation was complete and I booted the installed system, I got this default desktop:

rest here




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