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Bodhi Linux review

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Linux

Bodhi Linux is a very interesting Linux distro. It is generally based on Ubuntu but unlike the other Ubuntu-based distros which usually try to give users a newbie-friendly and work-out-of-the-box experience, Bodhi is very minimalistic. By default, Bodhi comes with very few necessity applications pre-installed so users will have to choose the other applications to install. Beside the simplicity, another special thing about Bodhi is Enlightment - the desktop environment. I myself have been using Linux for serveral years but I never tried Englightment before ( as I just recently heard about it) so 2 days ago, I decided to try Bodhi Linux on my Sony laptop. This article is my review about Bodhi Linux after 2 days of playing and testing it.

Download and Installation

The ISO image of Bodhi Linux is just a little bigger than 400 MB ( the version Im using here is the newest one, 1.14), very light comparing to most other linux distros. Another good point is that the torrenting download option is available. And as in common with most Linux distro, you can burn the ISO image to make a live CD or use Unetbootin to create a bootable USB to test and install Bodhi Linux.

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