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Should Fedora abandon release names?

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Linux

Fedora has a long history of release names. Some have been serious (Verne, Goddard, Cambridge), while others have been a little less so (Werewolf, Moonshine, Zod). Perhaps the silliest of them yet, Fedora 17 will be "Beefy Miracle," a release name that's been floating around for quite some time. Apparently, some consider Beefy Miracle to be offensive, because it refers to food made with beef. Given the complexity of selecting a "safe" release name, should Fedora drop names altogether?

This was a problem we ran into with openSUSE as well, when it was decided that release names would be taken from European philosophers. Pretty simple and non-controversial, right? Turns out, the first release name chosen (Fichte) was a German philosopher who was also known for being anti-Semitic. That naming scheme was quickly abandoned.

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Fedora 17 Beta Review

unixmen.com: The Beta version of Fedora 17, codenamed “The Beefy Miracle” was released a few days ago. Many of the popular applications have been upgraded to their latest (and in some cases, pre-release versions).

Fedora 17 comes with the newest versions of the popular Desktop Environments, Gnome Desktop and KDE Plasma Desktop, (3.4 and 4.8 respectively). They come with many improvements that enhances the user experience.

Improvements for the Gnome Desktop App Menus, A virtualization application called “Boxes ” and some little fixes in the user interface.

KDE 4.8 also has a slew of improvements like adaptive power management, an Instant Messenger suite called KDE-Telepathy, kwin optimizations and a rewritten version of “Dolphin”, the file manager, among many others.

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