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Microsoft: We Don’t Compete with Linux, But with Linux Vendors

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With initiatives like the Imagine Cup and PhoneGap Meetup, Microsoft is surely taking many steps forward to engage with open source communities across the globe, including India. At the sidelines of OSI Days 2011, Gianugo Rabellino, senior director of Open Source Communities, Microsoft, and Mandar Naik, director, Platform Strategy, Microsoft, spoke to Rahul Chopra, editor, LINUX For You, on Microsoft’s “openness” to open source, and its key strategies to befriend application developers for mobile platforms, the Azure project, et al.

LFY: This is your first trip to India. So far, how has the interaction been with the community here? Anything unique that struck you?

GR: A few days back, we were in front of roughly 300 people in Chennai and they were really looking forward to talking with us. We got bombarded with questions; it was a very lively audience.

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