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Best Media Center Software for Linux

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Software

It's been quite a long time since Microsoft first unveiled Windows Media Center. The entertainment tool catered to a special group of users who wanted to convert their computer into a full-fledged media center. And though Redmond's ambitious endeavor never really got the expected response, the idea of having a media center on a computer appealed to many users.

This fledgling interest in entertainment software gave birth to many Linux-based media center applications and distributions. Some of them took off, and some of them never hit the limelight; however, one thing was clear, the concept was quite fascinating, so much so that Apple TV, Google TV and even Ubuntu TV are very much inspired by these media centers. For example, Boxee, which is based on XBMC -- which, we’ll cover later in the article -- has gained quite a lot of popularity as an Internet TV box. Thus, there is very little doubt that these media center software are quite important and, to an extent, indispensable for some.

So, if you too are looking to revamp your computer into a complete media center, here are some of the best applications that will help you do that:

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