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What's new in Linux 3.4

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Linux

The kernel developers have needed only two months to complete the recently published 3.4 version of the Linux kernel; yet, the release offers the usual number of new features. Some of the features are as interesting for data centre administrators as they are for users who run Linux on desktop PCs or notebooks.

Graphics

Just hours after NVIDIA released its GeForce GTX 680 graphics card – with which NVIDIA has ushered in the switch from the Fermi to the Kepler architecture – kernel developers added rudimentary support for it to the Nouveau DRM/KMS driver. Initially this only enabled basic functionality such as setting common display modes including standard widescreen display resolutions that are not supported by the VESA driver. A bit later, the development versions of the Nouveau drivers in Mesa 3D and X.org also gained support for this card. It's likely to be several months before the major Linux distributions include all of the components required for the GTX 680 out of the box; for that to happen someone first needs to write some open source firmware for it.

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