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Mageia 2 Review – Pure Magic

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Mageia has been pretty popular ever since its original release last year. While all Linux distributions give you more choice than any other operating system, Mageia was one of the few distros that has a lot of these choices upfront. This is partly due to it being an offshoot of Mandriva, however the team at Mageia have taken it noticeably further.

Straight off the bat, the Mageia 2 installer offers a huge amount of options, features, and customisation that allows you to build up your system your own way. With the ability to choose any or all of the included desktop environments, add extra package sources, and even advanced network set-up. Obviously as well you get custom install partitioning and user name creation that other installers come with. Even if you’re not the sort of intermediate or more advanced user that would completely understand all the available options, the default selections will suffice for more novice folks.

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