Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux UEFI compromise reasonable, still sucks

Filed under
Linux

Life is full of trade-offs, and many times they are not palatable for every side. Such was the trade-off proposed by Fedora developers this week to solve the upcoming obstacle of UEFI secure booting on Windows 8-certified machines.

Red Hat developer Matthew Garrett has been trying to find a solution for this major obstacle since he brought it to public attention last Fall. Last week, his proposal sent shockwaves through the community. Rather than create a Fedora-specific key that could unlock the UEFI secure boot feature (but only for Fedora), Garrett and his team are proposing a more open two-stage bootloader approach.

After paying a one-time $99 certification fee to Verisign for a Microsoft-signed certificate, the first-stage bootloader will have one job: boot to a second bootloader that's signed with a Fedora key and have the second bootloader (Grub 2.0) roll into Fedora or whatever the user chooses.

Rest here




not reasonable

I find it typical of MS. They prefer to remove competition instead of making a more secure OS. nothing new here except seeing them find a new way to try to keep a grasp on their installed base, without which and their non-compete practices, they would have sunk by now.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation Grows So Much it Hires a Chief of Staff

The Linux Foundation hired Sheryl Chamberlain to fill the newly-created position of chief of staff. She’ll oversee operational activities for the foundation and be the point of contact between executive management and stakeholders in its numerous open source projects. Previously, Chamberlain was a partner VP at the consulting company Capgemini where she led activities to assist Dell Technologies. Prior to joining Capgemini, she worked at EMC in a variety of roles, including chief operations officer in the corporate office of the CTO. Read more Also:

  • Container Network Interface Project Joins CNCF
    CNI is now the tenth official project that is part of the CNCF. At the Cloud Native Computing Foundation / Kubecon event in March 2017, the CNCF added Dockers' Containerd and CoreOS' rkt container runtimes as the seventh and eighth projects. CNCF itself is a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project and is home to the Kubernetes container orchestration and management platform. In a video interview conducted at Kubecon, Chris Aniszczyk, COO of Cloud Native Computing Foundation discussed the importance of CNI and why it would likely become part of the CNCF.
  • Linux Kernels 4.9.29, 4.4.69 and 3.18.54 Released Networking Changes, Many Fixes

today's howtos

Gaming News

Linux Devices