Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux UEFI compromise reasonable, still sucks

Filed under
Linux

Life is full of trade-offs, and many times they are not palatable for every side. Such was the trade-off proposed by Fedora developers this week to solve the upcoming obstacle of UEFI secure booting on Windows 8-certified machines.

Red Hat developer Matthew Garrett has been trying to find a solution for this major obstacle since he brought it to public attention last Fall. Last week, his proposal sent shockwaves through the community. Rather than create a Fedora-specific key that could unlock the UEFI secure boot feature (but only for Fedora), Garrett and his team are proposing a more open two-stage bootloader approach.

After paying a one-time $99 certification fee to Verisign for a Microsoft-signed certificate, the first-stage bootloader will have one job: boot to a second bootloader that's signed with a Fedora key and have the second bootloader (Grub 2.0) roll into Fedora or whatever the user chooses.

Rest here




not reasonable

I find it typical of MS. They prefer to remove competition instead of making a more secure OS. nothing new here except seeing them find a new way to try to keep a grasp on their installed base, without which and their non-compete practices, they would have sunk by now.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Developing Linux Is Essential To Intel's Success

The dominant position of Intel in the server processor market is likely helped by the company's consistent strong support for Linux. Based on the W3Techs chart below, Linux is almost as popular as Windows-based servers are. Read more

Firefox OS heading for Africa — and the U.S. too

Orange announced a $40 “Klif” Firefox OS phone for Africa, and Mozilla says it’s working with Verizon Wireless and others on Firefox OS feature phones. There’s still no evidence that Mozilla’s HTML-focused Firefox OS has made much of a dent in the world smartphone market, where it has been focused on low-end devices sold primarily to emerging markets. Yet, Firefox OS still leads the way among upstart, Linux-based mobile operating systems, and will soon be available in more than 40 markets, this year, on a total of 17 smartphones, according to its latest stats. Meanwhile, the very first Tizen (Samsung Z1) and Ubuntu (BQ Aquaris E4.5) phones have only just shipped, and Jolla’s Sailfish OS based Jolla phones are still mostly limited to Europe. Read more

Why large companies use open source ERP

The main reason larger companies use open source Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems is because they are cheaper and easier to customize. Read more